View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Aug 19, 2018 5:34 am



Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
 Floating Engine (Fireboat) 
Author Message
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post Floating Engine (Fireboat)
I was reading an account in the Naval Chronicle (1804, Volume XI) about a fire on board Wembury (merchantman) while she was at Hamoaze. It mentions that the "floating engines of the Dock-yard were soon under weigh" and that the "great floating engine was of essential service."

Does anyone know what the floating engines looked like? Were they purpose built or just small vessels with fire engines mounted in them?

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Dec 25, 2010 11:31 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post Re: Floating Engine (Fireboat)
...No illustration, but I have seen mention of them before in the TDA, e.g:

The Times, September 27, 1785:

” .....Saturday morning a fire broke out on board a large barge at Dock-head, which was burnt down to the water-edge, and greatly damaged the rigging of a vessel lying next to her, but by the activity of the firemen, with the floating engine, was prevented from doing any other damage. .....”

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sun Dec 26, 2010 10:26 am
Profile YIM
Commander

Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:27 am
Posts: 389
Location: Australia
Post Re: Floating Engine (Fireboat)
susan wrote:
I was reading an account in the Naval Chronicle (1804, Volume XI) about a fire on board Wembury (merchantman) while she was at Hamoaze. It mentions that the "floating engines of the Dock-yard were soon under weigh" and that the "great floating engine was of essential service."

Does anyone know what the floating engines looked like? Were they purpose built or just small vessels with fire engines mounted in them?


At this period, I would guess both. Certainly some non-naval floating fire engines were purpose built e.g. those owned by insurance companies. The navy, on the other hand, would have had a large number of yard craft available so perhaps some of these were converted. The floating engines were powered by oars and the larger ones could be difficult to move against wind or tide. The Dockyards were very concious of the danger of fire - given that they were full of highly combustible materials - and observed strict fire precautions. They were supplied with large numbers of fire engines. In December of 1776 when the Portsmouth Dockyard ropewalk (a large building) was destroyed by fire (sabotaged by the American Colonial sympathiser/agent Jack the Painter) the dockyard would have had about 30 land engines, the most powerful of which could move 180 gallons per minute out to 50 yds.
This, of course, does not answer your questions!

For a later example (1837) see:
http://books.google.com/booksid=AE44AAA ... ne&f=false Page 313. For an illustration see page 305.


Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:45 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 3 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.