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 Ship building programme 
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The 114 gun CORUNNA mentioned was probably one of the three 112 gun ships of the line launched in Havana in 1786/7 - CONDE DE REGLA, MEJICANO and REAL CARLOS.


Wed Aug 13, 2008 12:17 am
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IONIA wrote:
The 114 gun CORUNNA mentioned was probably one of the three 112 gun ships of the line launched in Havana in 1786/7 - CONDE DE REGLA, MEJICANO and REAL CARLOS.


..... thanks, Peter. That explains things a bit as I was looking for illustrations of the other two vessels.

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Wed Aug 13, 2008 5:35 am
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From The Times, April 18, 1820:

".... .The Lords of the Admiralty were expected at * on Tuesday. The establishment at * increases under the fostering hand of Administration, and appears to be quite a favourite with the two Naval Boards. There are already 13 building-slips there, and a dry dock has just been completed. At present, however, it appears to be only an auxiliary to Plymouth, as the ships built at * are invariably sent round to Hamoaze. It requires no great penetration to foresee, that at a future period this new yard, on account of the noble harbour attached to it, will be of very great national importance. .... The consumption of timber in Plymouth-yard is considerably greater now than in war-time, the repairs of ships being on a greater scale. The supply of timber is very great, and the artificers, &c., are in full employ - West Briton.... "


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Mon Sep 01, 2008 10:42 am
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From The Times, July 6th, 1797:

" ...The keel of a new ship of 98 guns, is ordered to be laid down in the King's Dock-yard, at Chatham, to be called the Europe. She will be constructed wholly of English Oak, which has been some time collecting, and from a model on the largest scale and newest improvements of Naval Architecture. ....."



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Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:13 pm
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The Times, October 5th, 1795:

" ... The following are the names now affixed by the Admiralty Board to the five new ships of 64 guns, building at private dock-yards in the River, the keels of which were laid down for the East India Company, and purchased by Government: LANCASTER, WEYMOUTH, YORK, ARDENT, and MONMOUTH. ....."


I don't think the forum has touched much on private yards - I stand to correction, if I am wrong - so would anyone care to add anything they know about those yards, I wonder.

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Mon Dec 01, 2008 11:12 am
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The Times, October 7, 1790:

" ... The cultivation of Timber fit for the Navy ought by all possible means to be encouraged over the whole kingdom; but, in the New Forest, situated so near the first British Port, it is indispensibly necessary. Not a spot of it should be unproductive. Perish al the deer in the Forest, and may venison never appear on the tables of epicures, rather than that the Navy of Britain should, through inattention, decrease for want of timber ..."



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Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:47 am
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This topic has rung a small bell; please feel free to move or delete if I am starting to ramble.

About fifteen years ago we rented a small guard house in a West Country castle for our first family holiday. Unbeknown to me, the castle was owned by a retired RN officer, the former commander of KGV, who later captained Argonaut, in the Pacific. He was slightly built, with one bad eye, and quite an unassuming manner, although a personality and presence that were strong came through; he still had the air of command. We had many good conversations; of his time in the Pacific he dwelt longer on his success in providing regular ice cream for his men than beating off successive Kamikaze attacks. Before we went he showed me his private museum, which had a large picture of Collingwood on one wall. I mentioned the Northerner’s habit of carrying acorns which he would scatter wherever he went, to ensure sufficient oak to build ships for future generations. At this point my host reached into his pocket and brought out a handful of acorns.

I later lent him one of my early biographies of Nelson. On its return he included a long letter written in impeccable copperplate, which I have kept. At the end he mentions the weather being similar to that experienced when they we heading for Ireland, desperately short of fuel, having just sunk the Bismarck...

I carry acorns whenever possible.

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Sun Jan 04, 2009 6:45 pm
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Hi Jim, thanks for posting that story.

I wonder if any of Collingwood's contemporaries followed the same practice?

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Mon Jan 05, 2009 7:37 am
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The Times, September 30th, 1791:

" ... PLYMOUTH, September 27 .... The Caesar and Foudroyant, of 80 guns each, on two decks, and on a new plan*, are building here very fast; the former is so far finished as to be ready for launching next March; the latter has her frame up, and, from the great dispatch they have used in building the Caesar, may be expected to be ready, likewise in the course of two years. ...."


* Any comments on the "new plan"?




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Wed May 13, 2009 9:05 am
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The Times, September 30th, 1791:

" ... PLYMOUTH, September 27..... Orders are received here for laying down a first rate, on a very large scale, called the Globe; the model they have already begun in the Mould Loft, and she is expected to be laid down in a few weeks. ...."

I can't find a listing of the ship, so I wonder if she was ever built.


p.s. for recently-joined members: the Plymouth thread on the forum.

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Last edited by Mil Goose on Wed May 27, 2009 10:40 am, edited 2 times in total.



Wed May 27, 2009 9:01 am
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This was probably the HIBERNIA 110, ordered December, 1790, the keel being laid in Plymouth Dockyard in November, 1792. She was completed in March, 1805 and sold out of the Service at Malta in 1902. Didn't quite make a century.


Wed May 27, 2009 9:48 am
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IONIA wrote:
This was probably the HIBERNIA 110, ordered December, 1790, the keel being laid in Plymouth Dockyard in November, 1792. She was completed in March, 1805 and sold out of the Service at Malta in 1902. Didn't quite make a century.




..... thanks for that Peter! Your input explains a lot; no wonder information is scant. :)


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Thu May 28, 2009 9:57 am
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The Times, April 17th, 1788:

" ..... Five new ships of the line, which the Lords of the Admiralty have ordered to be built in the King's dock-yards, whose keels are to be laid in the course of the present year, are as follows:

Thunderbolt, 100, Chatham; Bedford, 90, Portsmouth; Duke of York, 80, Plymouth; Princess, 74, Woolwich; Foudroyant, 74. Deptford ...."





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Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:19 am
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The Times, December 1st, 1785:

" .... Large quantities of timber are now cutting down in the New Forest, which are ordered to be conveyed to the King's dock-yard at Portsmouth, where it will be put under proper sheds to season, previous to its being cut for use. The oak so prepared has been hitherto proved the best and most durable of any that has been procured anywhere. ......



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Sun Aug 30, 2009 8:09 am
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The Times September 2nd, 1795:

"....... The Emerald, a new frigate of 38 guns, launched last week from Mr Pitcher's private yard at Northfleet, is also put in commission, and Capt. Berkeley appointed to command her. ..."




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Wed Sep 09, 2009 8:59 am
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