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 Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre 
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Post Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
There is a small (but perhaps growing?) group of books that deal with naval officers solving mysteries or acting as secret agents. Some examples would be the books by Wilder Perkins or Blighted Cliffs by Edwin Thomas. Often, these stories are more land-based and do not involve the sea battles that are integral parts of naval fiction.

I find them rather refreshing...a nice change from the more "traditional" books. I am curious to know what others think.


Thu Oct 23, 2003 7:25 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
susan wrote:
There is a small (but perhaps growing?) group of books that deal with naval officers solving mysteries or acting as secret agents. Some examples would be the books by Wilder Perkins or Blighted Cliffs by Edwin Thomas. Often, these stories are more land-based and do not involve the sea battles that are integral parts of naval fiction.

I find them rather refreshing...a nice change from the more "traditional" books. I am curious to know what others think.



....ah, now I've read that one by Edwin Thomas, the first in a series I believe. I am not a lover of mysteries/intrigue but I did very much like Thomas' easy style. The plot/characters were a little predictable, but one caught me out.

I'd read some more of the Thomas series, and any others. Do you have a recommended list? I don't know Perkins, btw.

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Fri Oct 24, 2003 5:27 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
Mil Goose wrote:
....ah, now I've read that one by Edwin Thomas, the first in a series I believe. I am not a lover of mysteries/intrigue but I did very much like Thomas' easy style. The plot/characters were a little predictable, but one caught me out.

I agree. The plot was predictable in places and a couple of the bad guys were easy to figure out. Overall, though, I enjoyed it.

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I'd read some more of the Thomas series, and any others. Do you have a recommended list? I don't know Perkins, btw.

There are three books in Perkins' Bartholomew Hoare series: Hoare and the Portsmouth Atrocities, Hoare and the Headless Captains and Hoare and the Matter of Treason. Alas, there will be no more because the author passed away a few years ago.

Aside from Perkins, there is Bruce Weiser (Nicholas Chenevix). His first book deals with codes and ciphers. An amusing aside...the cover art of the edition I have (US paperback) makes it look like a romance novel
:roll: I haven't been able to get a hold of his second book yet.

I am currently reading Captain Justice by Anthony Forrest. It's a more complex book than the one by Thomas. I am looking forward to reading the other books in the series.

If anyone has any other authors/titles to add to the list, please do. :D


Sat Oct 25, 2003 1:37 am
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To add to the list (courtesy of Jens Kuhn):

The Stephan Löfving series by Björn Holm. Löfving is a spy in the service of the Swedish fleet during the period 1714-1719.

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Mon Dec 15, 2003 6:36 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
There is a small (but perhaps growing?) group of books that deal with naval officers solving mysteries or acting as secret agents. Some examples would be the books by Wilder Perkins or Blighted Cliffs by Edwin Thomas. Often, these stories are more land-based and do not involve the sea battles that are integral parts of naval fiction.



.......................just adding to this thread, I recently read Thomas' second book, The Chains of Albion, which I thought started off slow but picked up rapidly, weaving fact and fiction throughout 1806, and finishing in grand style in Brighton.

I never have been in Brighton Pavilion in the amount of times I've visited the town - no, sorry has city status now I think - but am due for a few days stay there in December, so shall make a point of doing so this time. :wink:

Anyhow......a recommended read.

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Mon Aug 02, 2004 7:40 am
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
Mil Goose wrote:
....just adding to this thread, I recently read Thomas' second book, The Chains of Albion, which I thought started off slow but picked up rapidly, weaving fact and fiction throughout 1806, and finishing in grand style in Brighton.

I have this book in my "to read" stack. Glad to hear that you enjoyed it.

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Tue Aug 03, 2004 6:42 pm
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I just finished reading Thomas' The Chains of Albion. I enjoyed it. Fast-paced for the most part, it's an interesting glimpse into the world of intelligence gathering.

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Fri Dec 03, 2004 6:19 pm
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susan wrote:
I just finished reading Thomas' The Chains of Albion. I enjoyed it. Fast-paced for the most part, it's an interesting glimpse into the world of intelligence gathering.



I hope to follow in his footsteps next week on a visit to Brighton. I've never been to the Royal Pavilion before, so I'm looking forward to that.

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Fri Dec 03, 2004 6:29 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
Mil Goose wrote:


.......................just adding to this thread, I recently read Thomas' second book, The Chains of Albion, which I thought started off slow but picked up rapidly, weaving fact and fiction throughout 1806, and finishing in grand style in Brighton.

I never have been in Brighton Pavilion in the amount of times I've visited the town - no, sorry has city status now I think - but am due for a few days stay there in December, so shall make a point of doing so this time. :wink:




.........well, I got down in Brighton last week, featured in Chains of Albion, and visited the Royal Pavilion.

I was absolutely thrilled with the place...........so extravagant and sumptious, but with a very hospitable feeling to it. The Music Room is absolutely beautiful. Although extremely opulent, I could identify with the place inasmuch as you could imagine yourself there at a function given a bit of social status. :wink:

A fellow visitor, a Friend of the Pavilion, said she attended a soiree there recently and said it was an unbelievable experience. I can well imagine it being so.

Anyhow, here's a link to the palace; have a look for yourself....

http://www.royalpavilion.org.uk/

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Tue Dec 14, 2004 2:08 pm
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I just discovered that the next Edwin Thomas book Treason's River will be out in July of this year.

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Tue Mar 01, 2005 11:25 pm
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Post David Donachie
Might I also recommend the Privateer Mysteries by David Donachie. They are set in the 1790's and follow the adventures of Harry Ludlow, who has been forced out of the British Navy. He and his brother, James, find mysteries every where they travel. There are six novels in the series:
1. "The Devil's Own Luck" (where James is found standing over a dead officer on a 74-gun ship of the line)
2. "The Dying Trade"
3. "A Hanging Matter"
4. "An Element of Chance"
5. "The Scent of Betrayal"
6. "A Game of Bones"

Like other books by Donachie, these are very well written.

Don


Fri May 13, 2005 11:57 am
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susan wrote:
To add to the list (courtesy of Jens Kuhn):

The Stephan Löfving series by Björn Holm. Löfving is a spy in the service of the Swedish fleet during the period 1714-1719.


Susan, do you know if this series was ever translated from Swedish into English? Anyone? Don


Sat May 14, 2005 6:08 am
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timoneer wrote:
Susan, do you know if this series was ever translated from Swedish into English? Anyone? Don

Hi Don,

Not as far as I know. Which is a shame, because it does sound interesting.

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Sat May 14, 2005 6:00 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
susan wrote:
Aside from Perkins, there is Bruce Weiser (Nicholas Chenevix). His first book deals with codes and ciphers. An amusing aside...the cover art of the edition I have (US paperback) makes it look like a romance novel
:roll: I haven't been able to get a hold of his second book yet.


Susan, Do you know anything about this author? Is Bruce Weiser a pen name? Did he write anything other than these two books? Is he still alive and writing?

I did a search on the Internet and the only things I could find is the author's name and the two spy books: The French Impostor and Dispatch from Cadiz. And you already had that listed here on Sailing Navies so the Internet added nothing.

Per your posting, I bought both books from Abebooks and just finished the first. The cover is pretty accurate, this is more of a romance novel than any other AoS novel I have ever read. Salacious might be a better term! Putting that aside, Impostor is not a bad novel. The main plot is a little slow but the background descriptions of the French and English strategies and the political maneuvering behind the scenes is very interesting. This is the best part of the novel for me. Having Nelson in the opening helped to capture my interest.

The main characters from Impostor continue in Dispatch, including Madeleine St. Jean, so I expect more of the same in the second of this series.

The reason I ask about this author is that he seems very knowledgeable of the history of this era and I wondered if he wrote more in this genre.

Don


Sat Jun 11, 2005 4:01 pm
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Post Re: Mystery/Secret Agent Sub-Genre
timoneer wrote:
Susan, Do you know anything about this author? Is Bruce Weiser a pen name? Did he write anything other than these two books? Is he still alive and writing?

I have no information on him. As far as I know, those were the only two books that were published.

Quote:
The cover is pretty accurate, this is more of a romance novel than any other AoS novel I have ever read. Salacious might be a better term! Putting that aside, Impostor is not a bad novel.

I didn't think it was too bad. I think the covers do the books a disservice. I can see that they would be a turn-off to some of the more "serious" fans of the genre. Perhaps they hurt sales.

The title of "King of Salacious Stuff" has to go to Dewey Lambdin, though.

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Sat Jun 11, 2005 7:51 pm
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