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 Julian Stockwin: Command 
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Post Julian Stockwin: Command
NO SPOILERS!!!

.
..I just finished Command and make no secret of the fact that the character Kydd annoys me with his speech! ;) I picked up this book so many times, got so far before Kydd irked me, so put the book aside again. :x

However, I wish I had persevered and once I had got over my annoyances I found this a wonderful yarn set during the Peace of Amiens and involving many twists and turns for Kydd. I won't spoil by saying what happened, just suffice to say that of the real people making appearances in the pages are Sir Sidney Smith, Earl St Vincent, Sir John Borlase Warren and one whom I went in search of in recent months, Matthew Flinders - third item down - but who has appeared in several threads if you do a search on the forum.

If anyone wants to discuss this book, I would be very happy to do so, as usual!

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Thu Apr 26, 2007 2:27 pm
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Post Re: Julian Stockwin: Command
Mil Goose wrote:
If anyone wants to discuss this book, I would be very happy to do so, as usual!

NO spoilers in this section.

Mary, I know that you are not finished with your voyage until the 18th but I thought I would post this while it is fresh in my mind and we can continue it further after you see this. Maybe some other readers of this book would want to comment before then also. I want to add a few names to your list of real persons appearing: Admiral Keith (Elphinstone), and from the US Navy: William Bainbridge, and Stephen Decatur.

SPOILERS BELOW!

I truly liked the twists and turns in this book concerning Kydd's assignments. From lieutenant on "Tenacious" to the rank of Commander on "Teazer" then Master on "Totnes Castle" and the special mission on "Suffolk." Good stuff.

I liked the small details provided by Stockwin, like the red flag on the gunpowder lighter, the trap door storage compartment, and the yardarm tips painted white for night work aloft. I enjoyed reading how Kydd used his sextant to measure the angle between the horizon and the topmast of his prey to see if he was gaining ground. Little details like these really make a book for me.

Another thing I liked were the descriptions of the places Kydd and Renzi visited on land --- Guildford, London, and the culture on New South Wales (Australia).

One thing that I didn't like was Kydd crying when his ship was de-commissioned and he was sent on half-pay due to the Peace of Amiens. It is more than acceptable for the characters to be human. Every author tries to give his hero some character flaws, I expect that. When the corsair tricks him with the drag-sail and Kydd is humiliated, fine with me. However, the "hot gush of tears that would not end" went a little too far with me. Certainly, he should have been sad, but…

Stockwin's novel solution to keeping Kydd together with Renzi in the future made me smile. That was really clever.

Don


Mon May 14, 2007 9:46 pm
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Post Re: Julian Stockwin: Command
timoneer wrote:
Mary, I know that you are not finished with your voyage until the 18th but I thought I would post this while it is fresh in my mind and we can continue it further after you see this.


......Sorry that it has taken so long to respond. I came from from my incredible adventure with such a cold it has taken me a while to recover. My experiences and delight at my travels were such that I might post some thoughts elsewhere on the forum.

I agree with what you have to say about the book and liked the diversity of it all and also agree with what you say with the exception of ....

Quote:
However, the "hot gush of tears that would not end" went a little too far with me. Certainly, he should have been sad, but…


.......is this a modern day masculine thing, I wonder? ...real men don't cry and stuff? I'm going to call on Susan to come up with instances of our erstwhile naval heroes crying in public since she has read so many accounts and letters.

I read where Nelson wept in public. One I read is recorded in the Naval Chronicle at the funeral of a two midshipmen (I'll find out where if necessary), another involved Troubridge after the Nile. I'll leave the latter in case Susan knows more about this than I do.

Anyhow, I'll be interested in your reply, or those of the other chaps on here, from male perspectives.

Quote:
Stockwin's novel solution to keeping Kydd together with Renzi in the future made me smile. That was really clever.
Don


...... yes, that was good news for the Renzi fans. :)

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Mon May 28, 2007 1:45 pm
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Post Re: Julian Stockwin: Command
SPOILERS BELOW!

Mil Goose wrote:
.......is this a modern day masculine thing, I wonder? ...real men don't cry and stuff? I'm going to call on Susan to come up with instances of our erstwhile naval heroes crying in public since she has read so many accounts and letters.

I read where Nelson wept in public. One I read is recorded in the Naval Chronicle at the funeral of a two midshipmen (I'll find out where if necessary), another involved Troubridge after the Nile. I'll leave the latter in case Susan knows more about this than I do.

Mary, I have no problem with a guy getting "choked up" or his eyes welling up with tears, daubing his eyes in public, even shedding a few tears at the death of a shipmate or friend. Just makes the character, real or fictional, more human. However, the words used by Stockwin of the "hot gush of tears that would not end" went a little too far for me. I know that Kydd was seriously disappointed but "uncontrollable" crying was a bit much. The character of Kydd has put up with a lot of disappointments (as well as successes) without breaking down like this. It's a matter of degree, not the act of crying, for me. If Stockwin had used different words, I would have sailed on by without a comment.

I'm glad you liked the Renzi solution too.

I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.

Don


Mon May 28, 2007 6:35 pm
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Thanks, Don, for your input. It's always good to have opinions from the male perspective....appreciated.

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Wed May 30, 2007 12:41 pm
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Written by an officer of the USS Hornet, during the War of 1812,

'Captain Biddle mustered the crew and told them he was pleased with their conduct during the chase, and hoped still to perceive that propriety of conduct which had always marked their character, and that of the American tar generally, that we might soon expect to be captured, &c. Not a dry eye was to be seen at the mention of capture. The rugged hearts of the sailors, like ice before the sun, warmed by the divine power of sympathy, wept in unison with their brave commander.'

Don Seltzer


Wed May 30, 2007 2:19 pm
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