View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:26 pm



Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
 Horses on Board 
Author Message
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post Horses on Board
This is sort of related to the cattle/livestock thread.

From History of the King's German Legion (Vol. I) (1832) by N. Ludlow Beamish the following description:

"A horse transport contains, according to its size, from eighteen to forty horses, which are placed close together across the hold, with their heads towards the centre, where is a wooden trough for the reception of forage. Small upright posts are fixed between their heads, which are fastened on each side by short ropes, in order to prevent them from lying down, and their chests and haunches are covered by sheepskins, to save them from being stripped by the rolling of the vessel. This closely packed stable is ventilated by means of sacks, which hang from the deck into the main hatchway; but in still or warm weather this is of little service, and the animals then suffer extremely from the oppression of the atmosphere. If a long voyage be anticipated, the horses are generally slung by tackles, to prevent them from resting on their legs, which expedient enables them to bear the confinement with less inconvenience."

This was part of a footnote in Chapter IX with details from 1808.

Later in the same chapter, details of the landing at Maceira Bay on 25 August 1808:

"The horses of the third hussars, which had been seventeen weeks on ship-board, and were now obliged to swim ashore, could with difficulty reach the land. Often was an unfortunate animal, after having been cast upon the beach by one wave and unable immediately to get on his legs, borne back by the next into the sea, and again cast ashore to be driven from it in the same manner. Several horses were thus lost. Forty had already died or had been shot for glanders produced by their confinement on board the transports; the greater part of those which landed were found lame and unfit for immediate service, and when the regiment came to be mustered, scarce half of its original numbers was fit to take the field."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Tue Oct 02, 2007 8:14 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
.... what wonderful information! I'm afraid I cannot add anything so detailed, but I did come across this of a horse in a sling from the NMM collection.

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Last edited by Mil Goose on Tue Oct 02, 2007 12:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Oct 02, 2007 11:05 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
A couple more pics from the NMM site:

Embarking troops and horses at Ramsgate
Flying Artillery or A Horse Marine (caricature) - humorous

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Tue Oct 02, 2007 11:21 am
Profile YIM
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:34 am
Posts: 1471
Location: Virginia, USA
Post Re: Horses on Board
susan wrote:
This is sort of related to the cattle/livestock thread.

If you want to see a video image of one loading method:

In the second Hornblower episode titled "The Fire Ships," the supply ship "Caroline" is loaded with cattle from the shore. The cattle are first driven along planks from a pier onto a raft. The raft is moved to the ship and the cattle transferred via the normal hoist method using slings under the animal's belly. Stalls were provided for each animal. It would have been a similar method for horses, I assume.

Don


Thu Oct 11, 2007 1:43 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 


...a bit lengthy, but worth relating, in this thread, about a battle between man and beast.

From The Times of February 8th, 1811:

" ... During the late embarkations of the dragoon horses, at the Dock-yard, Plymouth, two of them were found so completely ungovernable as to frustrate all endeavours to sling them, and they were, in consequence, sent back to their barracks; but on Thursday last, a singular occurrence happened during the embarkation of the 11th dragoons. A fine spirited horse had baffled all the efforts of the dragoons, &c. to sling him, and became so ungovernable as to tender it dangerous to approach him; however, a sailor, with characteristic indifference to danger, dragged the animal to the Jetty Head, and proceeded to put the slings under his belly, but he soon received a severe kick on his forehead, which laid it open, and the horse got loose and dashed off; then, to the astonishment of the bystanders, he wheeled round, and returned to the sailor, who lay at his full length, near the Jetty, or Pier, and, with his right fore-foot, pushed him off the Jetty into the sea beneath. The sailor, though nearly stunned, swam to shore, mounted the Jetty, seized the animal, and wet and bleeding as he was, finally succeeded in slinging and sending him on board. ....."




_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sat Sep 20, 2008 10:54 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
Mil Goose wrote:
he soon received a severe kick on his forehead, which laid it open, and the horse got loose and dashed off; then, to the astonishment of the bystanders, he wheeled round, and returned to the sailor, who lay at his full length, near the Jetty, or Pier, and, with his right fore-foot, pushed him off the Jetty into the sea beneath. The sailor, though nearly stunned, swam to shore, mounted the Jetty, seized the animal, and wet and bleeding as he was, finally succeeded in slinging and sending him on board.

Ouch. That's one tough fellow. Small wonder the navy didn't think too highly of ferrying the army types about.

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Sep 20, 2008 10:18 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
Detailed information about transporting horses on board ships is included in Remarks on the Transport of Cavalry and Artillery (1854) by Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Shirley.

In addition to the canvas slings, solid wooden horse boxes were used to hoist them aboard. Does anyone know what these looked like? (Google search only produced modern versions on wheels.)

Dung was removed daily from the stalls; placed in baskets, which were drawn up through the hatchways; and dumped overboard.

Chaos during a sudden squall, when the collars provided for the horses failed and more than half of the 46 horses on board the tranport Tanjore got loose:

"One horse, finding himself completely at liberty, and terrified beyond measure, as his side of the ship was uppermost (the vessel laying on her beam ends), sprung with a sudden bound out of his stall, clearing water-barrels, his own manger, and my head in the effort, and at one spring cleared the whole breadth of the vessel (a 700-ton ship), and alighted on the backs of three of his opposite neighbours, all kicking, squealing, and roaring in concert..."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Thu Dec 18, 2008 5:26 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
susan wrote:
Detailed information about transporting horses on board ships is included in Remarks on the Transport of Cavalry and Artillery (1854) by Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Shirley.

.......Dung was removed daily from the stalls; placed in baskets, which were drawn up through the hatchways; and dumped overboard.




... some interesting detail there, Susan. What else did he have to say on the complicated business of transporting horses?


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:31 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
susan wrote:
Detailed information about transporting horses on board ships is included in Remarks on the Transport of Cavalry and Artillery (1854) by Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Shirley.

In addition to the canvas slings, solid wooden horse boxes were used to hoist them aboard. Does anyone know what these looked like? (Google search only produced modern versions on wheels.)



... I've found something which is little beyond SN parameters, but I wonder if they looked anything like this one? (I don't seem able to post the URL of the specific photograph, so, if anyone wants to view, please scroll down to the fifth image.)


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:54 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
Mil Goose wrote:
... I've found something which is little beyond SN parameters, but I wonder if they looked anything like this one? (I don't seem able to post the URL of the specific photograph, so, if anyone wants to view, please scroll down to the fifth image.)

Thanks, that helps.

Here's the direct link: Sling Box

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Thu Dec 18, 2008 4:48 pm
Profile YIM
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 10 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.