View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:27 pm



Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
 Smuggling 
Author Message
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 5:47 pm
Posts: 64
Location: Connecticut within sight of two lighthouses
Post Smuggling
I'd have thought smuggling would have rated its own category here, but apparently not. I suppose I could have posted in the daily life ashore forum.

I found this dandy site and pass it on: Smuggler's Britain

I remember enjoying Patrick McGoohan and the Scarecrow movies and TV series.

There is a British classic on smuggling that has, as I recall, the word "moon" in it like Moonyard or Moonmere or something, but its name eludes me.

_________________
CAPT Caltrop
"Many’s the long night I’ve dreamed of cheese—toasted, mostly” (Ch. XV, p. 142). -Ben Gunn speaking to Jim Hawkins.

"What happens we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not."
-Hillaire Belloc


Sat Oct 29, 2005 5:34 pm
Profile WWW
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
Falkner's Moonfleet? It can be read here online.

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sat Oct 29, 2005 5:38 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post Re: Smuggling
CAPTCaltrop wrote:
I'd have thought smuggling would have rated its own category here, but apparently not.

I am always open to reasonable suggestions. :)

After a bit of thought, I felt smuggling would fit nicely with other "headaches" to all navies like pirates and slavers. Thus, this new forum.

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Oct 29, 2005 6:09 pm
Profile YIM
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 5:47 pm
Posts: 64
Location: Connecticut within sight of two lighthouses
Post Not headaches, "challenges"
susan wrote:
After a bit of thought, I felt smuggling would fit nicely with other "headaches" to all navies like pirates and slavers. Thus, this new forum.[/size]


Without them, navies might often need a raison d'etre.

Moonfleet, that was the novel I was thinking of. A good yarn marred only by a hint of anti-Semitism in one character.

_________________
CAPT Caltrop
"Many’s the long night I’ve dreamed of cheese—toasted, mostly” (Ch. XV, p. 142). -Ben Gunn speaking to Jim Hawkins.

"What happens we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not."
-Hillaire Belloc


Sat Oct 29, 2005 6:50 pm
Profile WWW
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post Re: Not headaches, "challenges"
CAPTCaltrop wrote:
Without them, navies might often need a raison d'etre.

True, true.

This forum is constantly evolving. I try my best to accomodate users' interests while staying true to my vision of what I want the forum to be.

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Oct 29, 2005 7:13 pm
Profile YIM
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:34 am
Posts: 1471
Location: Virginia, USA
Post 
I found an interesting book on this subject.

From "King’s Cutters – The Revenue Service and the War Against Smuggling" by Graham Smith.

"The period from 1720-1820 has quite rightly been called the heyday of smuggling. A hundred years is an unnecessarily long time for the country to be virtually besieged by the smugglers. Never before or indeed never again would the country suffer such a prolonged state of lawlessness -- the enormity and violence of the smuggling trade surpassed any other form of illegal activity. At certain times during the period the authorities appeared to lose all control and there was a strong possibility that the smugglers would take over many areas of the coast, certainly the maritime counties were in a constant state of war."

later in the book….

"The sheer audacity of the smugglers and their scant regard for authority is clearly shown in an incident off the Norfolk coast in June 1731. Joseph Southgate, the mate of the Walpole sloop then stationed at Wells, challenged two French shallops which he suspected of supplying brandy to a large fleet of Newcastle colliers anchored close to Burnham. One of the shallops opened fire on the Walpole whilst the other shallop attempted to ram and board the Walpole. Southgate decided that withdrawal was the better part of valour, but in spite of this, the two smuggling vessels chased the Walpole into Holkham Bay where they overwhelmed the vessel and boarded it. Southgate was unceremoniously carried onto one of the shallops and faced by Peters the master of the shallop and a notorious smuggler. Peters was just on the point of killing Southgate in cold blood when it was realised that he was not, in fact, Captain Harrold, the Commander of the Yarmouth sloop. Southgate's life was spared and he was released to pass on the threat to Harrold that Peters was resolved to kill him."

Smith’s book was originally published in Great Britain by Conway Maritime Press in 1983. He was the official historian of HM Customs and Excise at the time.

Mary, the incident I posted was from your area. Is there much recorded history of smuggling available for you to review (smuggling museum?) or is this something "hidden" away?

Don


Sat Nov 19, 2005 3:04 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
Yes, Don, it is my area, and I know Holkham Bay where close by lies Holkham Hall. If you drive in from the coast road then through the park and out of a rear entrance you actually drive into Burnham Thorpe. :)

I find the name of the sloop, Walpole, interesting. Robert Walpole, as you probably know is the first acknowledged Prime Minister of Britain, and in the fens, around Wisbech, we have a number of villages with the prefix of Walpole.

The Walpole family lived at Houghton Hall which has Nelsonian connections. I understand that Nelson's maternal grandmother was the sister of Robert Walpole. I further understand that, although the Nelsons were too impoverished to visit Houghton Hall itself, they did receive annual invitations to Wolterton Hall, the home of Walpole's brother, Horatio.


Smuggling is not a subject that has really grabbed me, so I've never pursued it really. I'll continue to hunt about for you but in the meantime I found a site listing maritime museums, etc in Britain. I note one, of which, is devoted to smuggling.

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon Nov 21, 2005 10:43 am
Profile YIM
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:34 am
Posts: 1471
Location: Virginia, USA
Post 
Mil Goose wrote:
I understand that Nelson's maternal grandmother was the sister of Robert Walpole. I further understand that, although the Nelsons were too impoverished to visit Houghton Hall itself, they did receive annual invitations to the home of Walpole's brother, Horatio.

Smuggling is not a subject that has really grabbed me, so I've never pursued it really. I'll continue to hunt about for you but in the meantime I found a site listing maritime museums, etc in Britain. I note one, of which, is devoted to smuggling.

The museum link you posted is interesting in that in addition to the Polperro Heritage Museum of Fishing and Smuggling, it contains a link toHM Customs and Excise National Museum in Liverpool which also covers smuggling, on a national scale. Probably worth a visit if one were in the area.

The Polperro museum, located in Cornwall, reminded me of the midshipman Bolitho book and other author's works about this subject. Cornwall was reputedly a hotbed of such illegal activity.

Brief note: Sir William Hoste (see separate post in Personnel thread) married Lady Harriet Walpole, 4th daughter of Horatio Walpole. Thus creating another connection, albeit minor, from Hoste to his mentor Nelson. I find all these interconnections fascinating.

Don


Mon Nov 21, 2005 8:41 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
As mentioned in another thread I happened across this site about smugging in Guernsey and thought you might like to share it.

My eye was taken by Peter the Painter in one of the family trees. Was this another Jack the Painter I asked myself? ... but, no, on a bit of searching I found the that aforementioned Peter was a marine artist. Further information here.

I plan to be in Guernsey next week, calm seas permitting, and hopefully will come across some interesting stuff.

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon May 07, 2007 12:47 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
From the United Service Journal (1829, Part II):

"These large bodies of smugglers are well organized. They consist of master-men or principal leaders, captains, scouts, flashers, and sometimes fighting men. When the smugglers intend to run a boat, the leader collects his captains, and desires them to assemble a body of men at an appointed time and place; each captain collects his own number, but neither they, nor the men thus engaged, have any idea at the time where it is likely the boat may land, that always being kept strictly secret. At the time appointed, the leaders meet them, and send out the scouts to see that the coast is clear, while all the smugglers are moving down to the sea-side. Should any officers be seen about, the alarm is immediately given by the flashers, who carry a flash-pan and powder for that purpose; this is a warning for the smugglers to keep clear of that spot: the flasher immediately decamps, for should he be caught with his flash-pan about him, his penalty is much greater than that of any other smuggler."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Wed Oct 07, 2009 4:05 pm
Profile YIM
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 5:47 pm
Posts: 64
Location: Connecticut within sight of two lighthouses
Post The Scarecrow, Dr. Syn and Smuggling
Smuggling in the Age of Fighting Sail is at the center of "The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh" series. Patrick McGoohan who was great in virtually everything stole this show. It seems with the advent of Halloween, scarey characters, Fighting Sail, and popular culture can all converge.

Image

Apparently Disney did a survey on the how the viewers were perceiving the show. A few kids said the Scarecrow scared them. (Hey, that's the point. Batman was supposed to be a bit scarey, too...to wrongdoeers) The minute Walt heard that he cancelled the series, though Disney still owns the rights to the Dr. Syn books which are terribly written. Just try to get a reprint of any of those books. Hard to do.

For once the TV series was BETTER than the underlying book series.

Clips on the "Scarecrow" can be found here:

http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl= ... =N&tab=wv#

I used to run the local Sea Scouting program. I once arranged for a "Smuggler's Regatta." The rules are different than for most sailing regattas. In a Smuggler's Regatta you can use "Swedish Steam," muscle power (rowing, paddling) to beat your oponents. Often that is exactly smugglers beat their adversaries. They'd either use fast pulling boats or man the sweeps upwind.

_________________
CAPT Caltrop
"Many’s the long night I’ve dreamed of cheese—toasted, mostly” (Ch. XV, p. 142). -Ben Gunn speaking to Jim Hawkins.

"What happens we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not."
-Hillaire Belloc


Wed Oct 07, 2009 4:43 pm
Profile WWW
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:25 am
Posts: 111
Location: Ventura, California
Post Re: The Scarecrow, Dr. Syn and Smuggling
CAPTCaltrop wrote:
A few kids said the Scarecrow scared them. (Hey, that's the point. Batman was supposed to be a bit scarey, too...to wrongdoeers)


Heck yeah it was scary. My older brother said it was totally stupid, but I didn't care. I loved it.

Broos

_________________
www.brooscampbell.com


Wed Oct 07, 2009 11:34 pm
Profile WWW
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 5:47 pm
Posts: 64
Location: Connecticut within sight of two lighthouses
Post Re: The Scarecrow, Dr. Syn and Smuggling
Broos Campbell wrote:
CAPTCaltrop wrote:
A few kids said the Scarecrow scared them. (Hey, that's the point. Batman was supposed to be a bit scarey, too...to wrongdoeers)


Heck yeah it was scary. My older brother said it was totally stupid, but I didn't care. I loved it.

Broos


Oh hell, are the only posters around here authors on nautical subjects?

http://dreadnaughts-bluejackets.com

_________________
CAPT Caltrop
"Many’s the long night I’ve dreamed of cheese—toasted, mostly” (Ch. XV, p. 142). -Ben Gunn speaking to Jim Hawkins.

"What happens we have got
the Maxim gun, and they have not."
-Hillaire Belloc


Thu Oct 08, 2009 3:37 am
Profile WWW
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 



The Times, June 10th, 1785:

" .... There has been laid before the Lords of the Treasury a plan for totally abolishing every species of River Smuggling. The person who has laid ti before the Board was formerly very extensively employed in the contraband traffic, and if his plan be adopted and succeeds, his reward is to be liberal. ....."


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:54 am
Profile YIM
Lieutenant

Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:53 am
Posts: 176
Location: UK
Post 
William Hickey, whose ‘Memoirs’ are well-known, was a Georgian rake and libertine, but a very likeable fellow, nonetheless. He practised law in India after a financial scandal in England. Returning home on one occasion in the ‘Plessey’ he describes in lively detail how Captain Waddell, by all accounts an otherwise admirable man, negotiated a satisfactory deal with a smuggler who bought his contraband tea.

A stranger came aboard. ‘He was of a Herculean form with a healthy ruby face. From his dress and appearance I should not have supposed he possessed ten pounds in the world. Captain Waddell conducted him into the roundhouse where the following short dialogue ensued:

Stranger: Well, Captain, how is tea?

Captain: Twenty pounds.

Stranger: No. that won’t do; eighteen – a great number of China ships this season.

Captain: Very well. You know best.

Stranger: How many chests?

Captain: Sixty odd.

Stranger: Come bear a hand then and get them into the cutter.

By this I found our new visitor was a smuggler. The foregoing was all that passed in completing the sale and purchase of so large a quantity of tea. In the same laconic manner he bought the stock of the different officers. '

After recording further inconsequential chat, Hickey continues, ‘The tea being all removed to the cutter, pen, ink and paper was produced; the smuggler, sitting down at a table in the roundhouse, calculated the amount due for his purchase, which Captain Waddell admitting correct he took from his pocket book a cheque, which filled up for twelve hundred and twenty four pounds he signed and delivered to the captain. I observed it was drawn upon Walpole and Company, Bankers in Lombard Street, and was astonished to see Captain Waddell with the utmost composure, deposit it in his escritoire.'.......

‘The moment he departed, I asked Captain Waddell whether he felt secure in a draft for so large a sum from such a man as that, to which he answered, ‘Perfectly. And wish it was for ten times as much; it would be duly paid. These people always deal with the strictest honour. If they did not, their business would cease.’

Hickey’s memoir also contains some superb descriptions of the horrendous storms he experienced at sea, including a hurricane in which 13 people were lost, a powerful insight into life aboard a sailing ship.

From: ‘Memoirs of a Georgian Rake’ William Hickey, Folio Society Edition 1995.
____


Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:06 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.