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 Ships 
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The Times May 25th, 1793:

".......on Monday was launched from Mrs Barnard's Dock-yard at Deptford, a fine ship, built at the bottom of the Royal Admiral, for the Hon. East India Company; she is the largest ship in their service, being pierced for 64 guns, and will mount 40 - 18 and 12 pounders. She afforded to a most numerous circle of fashion and beauty, who honoured the launch, a magnificent spectacle. The Lord Chancellor did the honour of naming her the Walmer Castle.

The company retired to an elegant cold collation on the spot, and the evening concluded with a dance. The politeness and attention of Mr Larkins, the ship's husband*, and Captain Bond, her commander, gave great satisfaction to all the company. ...."




* In my ignorance, I'd never heard of the term "ship's husband", but it is explained in the last paragraph of this link.




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Last edited by Mil Goose on Sat Sep 05, 2009 4:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sat Sep 05, 2009 8:48 am
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The WALMER CASTLE proved to be a very successful ship, making nine voyages to China during her twenty years service with the HEIC.


Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:15 am
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Post Re: Ships
Mil Goose wrote:


* In my ignorance, I'd never heard of the term "ship's husband", but it is explained in the last paragragh of this link.



The term "ship's husband" is not widely known. It was the topic for discussion on another list about a year ago, when one of the members said this:

"Christian Larkins was the ships husband for the East India Company ship WARREN HASTINGS. She took over after her husband's death in 1784. In the 19th century the term was gradually replaced by managing owner or managing agent. The former having some share in the ship the latter simply being paid to do the job. There were many British women who were managing owners throughout the century, acting on behalf of the other owners male and female."

It seems possible that it is primarily a British term, being virtually unknown to the American members of the discussion list.

The term is listed in Admiral Smyth's "Sailor's Word Book":

"The agent or broker who manages her accounts with regard to work performed, repairs, etc, under refit or loading".

In his "Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea" Peter Kemp elaborated a bit on this. He wrote that the agent was appointed by a deed executed by all the owners of the freight on board. He (or she) had power to advance and lend money, make all necessary arrangements regarding the freight, and receive all money from the sale of the freight. Kemp implies that the position was similar to that of a super-cargo.

Martin


Sat Sep 05, 2009 2:40 pm
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The Times, January 26th, 1787:

" .... Extract of a letter from Bristol, January 21 ....A new ship, of 74 guns, is to be built at Hilhouse Dock. Two large vessels of 1100 tons burthen are also going to be laid down, for the East India Company's service. In the scarcity of shipping for that service, with proper encouragement, this might be made one of the first ports for ship-building in England. ...."


Shipbuilding in Bristol


p.s. Can anyone identify the 74, please?


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Sat Oct 03, 2009 8:31 am
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Post Re: Ships
The Times, October 23rd, 1816:

" ........... LAUNCH OF THE WATERLOO: On Monday Blackwall and Poplar became the scene of much festivity, in consequence of the launch of a beautiful copper-bottomed vessel of 1315 tons burdern, for the service of the East India Company, from the dock of Sir Robert Wigram, Bart. at Blackwall. ....... "

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Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:00 pm
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Post Re: Ships
Mil Goose wrote:
The Times, October 23rd, 1816:

" ........... LAUNCH OF THE WATERLOO: On Monday Blackwall and Poplar became the scene of much festivity, in consequence of the launch of a beautiful copper-bottomed vessel of 1315 tons burdern, for the service of the East India Company, from the dock of Sir Robert Wigram, Bart. at Blackwall. ....... "


The WATERLOO was unusual in that she was the Company's own ship rather than chartered. She made nine voyages to China before being sold for breaking up in 1834.


Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:56 pm
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IONIA wrote:
Mil Goose wrote:
The Times, October 23rd, 1816:

" ........... LAUNCH OF THE WATERLOO: On Monday Blackwall and Poplar became the scene of much festivity, in consequence of the launch of a beautiful copper-bottomed vessel of 1315 tons burdern, for the service of the East India Company, from the dock of Sir Robert Wigram, Bart. at Blackwall. ....... "


The WATERLOO was unusual in that she was the Company's own ship rather than chartered. She made nine voyages to China before being sold for breaking up in 1834.



Thanks, Peter. I found a little more about the vessel, reference Bonaparte.

The Times, July 7th, 1821:

" ..... It is a singular coincidence, that the Waterloo East Indiaman, laden with necessities for his establishment at Longwood, arrived only two days before his death, just in time to witness his final setting. ....."

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Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:20 pm
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