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 Tokens of Appreciation 
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susan wrote:
From the Naval Chronicle (1804):

"AN instance of generosity, which reflects equally on the donors and receiver, occurred on board the Lively Frigate. The Captain, Officers, and Crew, subscribed nearly 50l. to Thomas Tough, a Marine, in testimony of their admiration of his brave and meritorious conduct in the action with the Fama Spanish Frigate, in which he lost his arm."




....that was very generous of them. Does anyone know of any other such instances?


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Thu Feb 05, 2009 5:30 pm
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Mil Goose wrote:
....that was very generous of them. Does anyone know of any other such instances?

Considering the treasure associated with the capture, I suppose they felt they could be generous. :D

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Thu Feb 05, 2009 6:34 pm
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The Times, September 5th, 1804:

" .. Last week Earl St Vincent and Sir Thomas Troubridge visited Liverpool, when the Corporation of that great, opulent, and commercial town presented those distinguished perons with its freedom, as a mark of grateful respect for the very eminent services which they had rendered to their country. ..."

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Fri Feb 06, 2009 11:08 am
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Post Lively and Fama
Does any member of the Forum has information on exactly what was paid to the Lively and other British ships involved in this incident?

It was of course the famous interception in October 1804 of the Spanish frigates, Medea, Mercedes, Fama and Clara which were returning with some 4 million dollars from the River Plate by a British squadron under the overall command of Captain Graham Moore comprising Indefatigable, Lively, Medusa and Amphion. The problem was that it was a pre-emptive strike made on the (correct) assumption that on its arrival the Spanish would declare war on the side of the French. Legally however we were at peace with Spain at the time so that normal war time rules on prize and head money did not apply and the captured treasure was technically a 'droit of the crown'.

Hornblower buffs will recall that our hero - whose sloop was part of Moore's force - absented himself from the action by decoying a fifth Spanish vessel away and thus did not share in the pay out!

The tragic non-fiction side of the incident was the accidental blowing up of the Mercedes with the loss of all on board, including the wife, four daughters and three sons of a Captain Alvear, a returning Spanish colonial offical together with all his possessions. Alvear and his 13 year old son only survived because they were on the Medea at the time.

According to William James, Lively's marine was not the only one to have been treated with generosity. The British Government (who must have been embarrassed by this arguably necessary act) compensated Alvear for his tragic loss by paying him the value of his lost fortune to the tune of £30,000.

There are two interesting related facts. (1) Medea was added to the Royal Navy and became Imperieuse - the ship in which Lord Cochrane consolidated his reputation. While (2) Alvear's surviving son, Carlos Antonio, eventually became Supreme Director of the United Provinces of the River Plate - modern Argentina - in 1815. As a result of long residence in England following the incident, Carlos not only spoke perfect English but seems to have borne no grudges for the Moore attack.

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Fri Feb 06, 2009 11:58 am
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Post Re: Lively and Fama
Brian Vale wrote:
Hornblower buffs will recall that our hero - whose sloop was part of Moore's force - absented himself from the action by decoying a fifth Spanish vessel away and thus did not share in the pay out!

O'Brian also used this event, with Aubrey in command of Lively.

Yes, the droits of admiralty thing. From what I remember from Tom Wareham's book about Graham Moore, it didn't turn out to be as happy a situation as they had anticipated.

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Fri Feb 06, 2009 4:52 pm
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Post Re: Lively and Fama
Brian Vale wrote:
Does any member of the Forum has information on exactly what was paid to the Lively and other British ships involved in this incident?
Brian Vale
One account states two hundred and fifty thousand pounds shared among the four frigates. This is about one quarter of the amount that they might have expected had the captures been prize.

It is interesting that the capture in 1808 of the BADERE ZAFFER by the frigate SEAHORSE (the source of another of Jack Aubrey's battles) was an exceptional case in that the full value of the capture was paid to the SEAHORSE even though Great Britain was not at war with the Ottoman Empire.

It is also interesting that after the Bombardment of Algiers and the battle of Navarino grants were made to the ships involved (no prize money as Great Britain was not at war with Algiers nor with the Ottoman Empire or Egypt).

"HANSARD 1803–2005 → 1830s → 1834 → July 1834 → 21 July 1834 → Commons Sitting
SUPPLY—BATTLE OF NAVARINO.HC Deb 21 July 1834 vol 25 cc323-7 323
§ On the Motion of Lord Althorp, the House resolved itself into a Committee of Supply.

§ Mr. Labouchere moved, that a sum not exceeding 60,000l. be granted to his Majesty to enable him to bestow gratuities to the Officers, Seamen, and Royal Marines, present at the Battle of Navarino on the 20th of October, 1827.

§ Colonel Davies asked, whether the distribution was to be upon the same scale as that made to the fleet engaged in the battle of Algiers?

§ Mr. Labouchere said, that the precedent of the distribution relative to the battle of Algiers would be followed as nearly as possible upon this occasion. The distribution would be made, not under any Prize Acts, but according to the provisions of an Order in Council. The Commander-in-Chief would receive 7,888l.; the first class of officers, including captains, 1,068l. each; the next class 94l.; the next 61l 1.; the next 15l.; the next 6l. 3s.; the first class of seamen 4l. 10s.; the next class 3l. 2s.; and the last class, consisting of boys, 1l. 10s. "


Fri Feb 06, 2009 10:07 pm
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Post Re: Lively and Fama
Thanks Ionia

More info to add to this fascinating and informative web site!

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Mon Feb 09, 2009 11:33 am
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The Times, Sept.14th, 1801:

" .. Admiral Sir Wm. Parker, on quitting the North-American station to return to England, was presented with an address from the Merchants and other inhabitants of Halifax, expressive of their gratitude to him for his unremitting attention to the protection of their commerce. ...."



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Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:38 am
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The Times, April 10th, 1805:

" ... The Committee of the Patriotic Fund at Lloyd's have passed a Resolution, for the purpose of providing for the seamen wounded on board the Centurtion, of 50 guns, in the engagement with the Marengo, Admiral Linois. ......


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Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:39 am
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This one is a little bit different inasmuch as it was awarded to a civilian for services to the fleet.


The Times, February 4th, 1805:

" ..... A cup of the value of one hundred guineas has just been finished by Messrs Rundle and Bridge, as a present to E Gayner, Esq. an English merchant residing in Spain, for important serives rendered by him to Lord Nelson's fleet. ..... "


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Fri Jul 24, 2009 10:13 am
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From the United Service Magazine (Jun 1841):

"...before the gun-room officers [of the Stag, 46] took leave of each other, they presented the Master, Mr. Brown, with a tea and coffee service, as a token of their personal esteem."

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Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:24 pm
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On page 2 of this thread, I posted a short snippet about how a young African boy was given as a gift to the captain of Favourite. I came across this:

Sarah Davies

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The Times, August 17th, 1804:

" .... The East-India Company have most liberally regarded the Commander and crews of the fleet which engaged Linois in the Chinese Seas. Commodore Dance has been voted the sum of 2000 guineas, and a piece of plate to the vale of 200; Captain Timins is to receive 1000 guineas, and 100 guineas for a piece of plate; and each of the other Captains 500 guneas, and a piee of plate of the vale of 100 guineas. The Chief Officers are to have 150 guineas; second ditto, 125; third and fourth 80; fifth and sixth, 50; pursers and surgeons 80; surgeons' mates, boatswains, gunners and carpenters, 50; midshipmen 30, other petty officers, 15, and seamen and servants, 6. Lieut. Fowler will have 300 guineas for a piece of plate. The total will amount to 50,000[(£). ...."




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Sat Nov 21, 2009 11:19 am
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Post Re: Tokens of Appreciation
From the United Service Journal (February 1829):

"They [the ship's company of Aurora] also gave an elegant snuff box, to be presented by the first lieutenant to Mr. Woodhead, the ship agent, to show their sense of his promptitude in having distributed on board at Devonport, a sum of salvage money, within a few days after its having been received by him in London. The officers made a similar present to Capt. C.J. Austen, whom they also entertained at dinner."

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