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 Tokens of Appreciation 
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From The Times of September 6, 1804:

" ..... yesterday the Court of Directors of the East India Company voted the sum of 100 guineas to Lieutenant Flinders, of the Royal Navy, for the purchase of a piece of plate; and resolved, that a master's-mate, two midshipmen, five warrant and petty officers, and four seamen, who were also passengers on board the Bombay Castle, should be allowed gratuities similar to those granted on the 15th ult. for their gallantry during the late brilliant action with Linois ...."




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Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:35 am
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From The Times, July 23, 1805:

".... The Committee for managing the Patriotic Fund at Lloyds, have settled an annuity of 20l(£) per annum on Mrs Maddock, of Sheerness, mother to the late Mr Maddock, Purser of his Majesty's sloop Le Curieux, who was killed in that very gallant action in the West Indies with the French privateer La Dame Ernouf, on the 8th February last, bravely fighting at the head of the small-arm men ......"


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Sun May 25, 2008 8:25 am
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From The Times, September 30, 1817:

".... Lord Amherst has presented Captain Murray Maxwell, C.B., with a valuable piece of plate. The inscription tells this officer it is a token of the estimation in which his private worth and professional character are held by his lordship ......"


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Fri Jun 20, 2008 9:33 am
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No doubt in recognition of Amherst’s diplomatic mission to China in HMS ALCESTE (Captain Murray Maxwell), accompanied on the outward voyage by HM Brig LYRA (Captain Basil Hall) and the East Indiaman GENERAL HEWITT (Captain Campbell). The wreck of the ALCESTE in the Gaspar Straits on her return voyage has been mentioned before in this Forum. After the wreck, Lord Amherst and his suite, accompanied by a guard of Marines, and totalling 47 people, sailed for Java in two of the ship’s boats provisioned with “a side of mutton, a ham, a tongue, about 20 pounds of coarse biscuit, and some few more of fine, seven gallons of water, the same of beer, as many of spruce, and about 30 bottles of wine – enough to sustain them for four or five days…..”. The experiences of Captain Maxwell and his ship’s company were later used by Patrick O’Brian as the basis of an incident covered by his “The Thirteen Gun salute” and “The Nutmeg of Consolation”.

At Maxwell’s Court Martial for the loss of the ALCESTE, Amherst stated that he had “selected Captain Maxwell, on the occasion of the embassy, from motives of personal friendship, as well as from the high opinion he entertained of his professional character, which opinion had been much increased by the events of the voyage”.


Fri Jun 20, 2008 10:55 am
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From The Times of December 8th, 1798:

" ..... On Thursday there was a very full Court of Common Council ..... Thanks were voted to Sir John Borlase Warren, and his Officers and Seamen; and that the Freedom of the City be given to him in a gold Box ..."



p.s. ...... in my ignorance, the Court was a new one to me, and just in case anyone else is interested in knowing more, this link provides more information.

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Tue Jul 01, 2008 10:28 am
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From Account of a Voyage to the Western Coast of Africa; Performed by His Majesty's Sloop Favourite, in the Year 1805 (1807) by F.B. Spilsbury, gifts from the slave factors after Favourite captured a French privateer that had been cruising in the area:

"...several boats came with different gentlemen (slave-factors) bringing goats, cattle, sheep, poultry, &c., &c. One of the company brought a very handsome boy slave about ten years old, as a present to the captain, and to whom we gave the name of John Favorite."

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Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:32 am
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Several 18th century decisions in English courts had established that slavery was not recognized under English law and that when a slave set foot in England he became a free man.

Did the legal concept of England extend to the decks of a Royal Navy ship?


Sun Jul 06, 2008 6:37 am
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IONIA wrote:
Did the legal concept of England extend to the decks of a Royal Navy ship?

That's an interesting question. He doesn't say if the boy was treated as a slave or just one of the ship's boys.

Later on he mentions that the captain of a slaver wanted to take the boy away, but the commander stopped him.

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Sun Jul 06, 2008 7:49 am
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IONIA wrote:
Did the legal concept of England extend to the decks of a Royal Navy ship?
I have read of several examples, particularly in the Mediterranean, of slaves claiming freedom by climbing aboard a Royal Navy ship, or even by grabbing hold of an English flag.

The law in the British colonies was, of course, different and Royal Navy captains certainly didn't assist slaves to freedom there. I think one or two captains brought slaves on board as servants. Presumably in law they were no longer slaves, but perhaps the point was academic - at least until the servant was discharged.

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Sun Jul 06, 2008 9:03 pm
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Tony wrote:
IONIA wrote:
Did the legal concept of England extend to the decks of a Royal Navy ship?
I have read of several examples, particularly in the Mediterranean, of slaves claiming freedom by climbing aboard a Royal Navy ship, or even by grabbing hold of an English flag.

The law in the British colonies was, of course, different and Royal Navy captains certainly didn't assist slaves to freedom there.


During the War of 1812, Admiral Alexander Cochrane issued a proclamation that any slaves that escaped their owners and made it to a RN vessel would be welcome. This was a tactic that had been tried previously during the War of American Independence. Cochrane intended that his offer should apply to the Chesapeake region, but a copy of the proclamation made its way south as far an English-owned plantation in Spanish Florida. A large number of slaves left the plantation and made their way to a British held island off the Georgia coast. Rear Admiral Cockburn took them aboard his ships, enlisting some, and transporting the rest (to Bermuda?). The ensuing lawsuits over their status lasted for years.

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Fri Jul 11, 2008 1:22 am
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Herewith a short piece from The Times, of January 6, 1806 about the Patriotic Fund:

".... The amount of the late subscriptions to the Patriotic Fund was, on Saturday, 104,000l of which sum, 64,000l. had been collected at churches, and other places of worship ...."



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Fri Jul 25, 2008 12:49 pm
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The Times, July 3rd, 1795:

" ... Yesterday the Committee of the Marine Society dined at Greenwich, and afterwards voted a Gold Whistle to the brave Boatswain who commanded the Scorpion Sloop of 16 guns on the American station, which retook the Hyena of 26 guns ...."



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Fri Jan 02, 2009 11:25 am
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Mil Goose wrote:



The Times, July 3rd, 1795:

" ... Yesterday the Committee of the Marine Society dined at Greenwich, and afterwards voted a Gold Whistle to the brave Boatswain who commanded the Scorpion Sloop of 16 guns on the American station, which retook the Hyena of 26 guns ...."




They may have been whistling in the wind. According to William James and others the HYAENA of 26 guns (Captain Hargood) was taken by the French frigate LA CONCORDE 40 in 1793. She became the privateer L'HYENE in French service and was recaptured off Teneriffe in October, 1797 by the INDEFATIGABLE 44 (Captain Pellew), and restored to the List.


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The Times, August 1, 1796:

" ... The Guild of Merchants in Dublin, have voted the Freedom of their Corporation to Count Romford; the same body have also complimented Captain Tomlinson of La Suffisante, with their Freedom, for his very gallant conduct in the capture of the Morgan French Privateer, &c ..."


Susan's SN entry for the vessel here.


p.s. It also appears that Royal Exchange Assurance presented him with a silver tea-urn for the same incident; details here.



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Fri Jan 23, 2009 11:10 am
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From the Naval Chronicle (1804):

"AN instance of generosity, which reflects equally on the donors and receiver, occurred on board the Lively Frigate. The Captain, Officers, and Crew, subscribed nearly 50l. to Thomas Tough, a Marine, in testimony of their admiration of his brave and meritorious conduct in the action with the Fama Spanish Frigate, in which he lost his arm."

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