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 Tokens of Appreciation 
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Post Tokens of Appreciation
From the May 1831 USJ:

"The captain and Officers of his Majesty's late ship Thetis have presented to Mr. Jacob Geach, boatswain, a very elegant silver cup; and to John Langley, Captain of the Foretop, a handsome silver tobacco box, for their manly and intrepid conduct on the night of the 5th of December. The petty officers and seamen of the Thetis also presented a gold chain, call, and plate with an inscription expressive of their gratitude to Mr. Geach, for his exertions in saving the lives of the crew on the occasion."

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Fri Nov 18, 2005 2:16 am
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From Sir Christopher Cole's entry in John Marshall's Royal Naval Biography:

"We, the crew of H.M.S. Caroline, wish to give you our most gracious thanks for the care and favour you have shown to this ship's company, by making you a present of a sword amounting to 100 guineas for your noble and brave conduct when you led us to the storm of Banda, and likewise the zealous bravery in landing our troops at Batavia; and by accepting of this present you will gratify the wishes of your most obedient ship's company, (Signed) The Carolines"

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Tue Apr 04, 2006 11:47 am
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From The Gentleman's Magazine (September 1810):

Admiral Montagu, late Port Admiral at Portsmouth, has been presented with a superb piece of plate, by the officers and commanders who served under his flag at that port. It is a massive soup-tureen of an oval form, supported by four eagles displayed (being the chief bearing in the Admiral's arms), on a handsome stand, with embossed shell and scroll end, cable border, and antique claw-feet. On each side the arms are elegantly chased; also medallions encircled by oak and laurel branches, bearing the following inscription in raised letters:

"To Admiral George Montagu, a Tribute of Respect and Esteem from the Captains of the Royal Navy, A.D. 1809."

At the handles are Neptune heads, with crest on the cover, and ladle end.

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Thu Aug 31, 2006 6:23 pm
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susan wrote:
cable border, and antique claw-feet.
At the handles are Neptune heads, with crest on the cover, and ladle end.

So, is that cable border hawser-laid? and who said they were antique claw-feet? ;)

Charity

P.S., this is very interesting, I just couldn't resist a bit of Aubrey-style humor...


Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:12 am
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I was perusing the pages of The Times, August 15th 1804 and ran across a report of a meeting of the Committee Patriotic Fund where mention was made of awarding a vase to the value of £100 suitably inscribed. I’d heard of the swords the Committee awarded but not of vases and a search revealed some nice illustrations:



HERE

HERE

HERE (If you scroll down on this one there are other interesting items at Bonhams – oh, for a win on the lottery :) )

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Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:24 am
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The LPF did award swords of £100 to captains, £50 and £30 to lesser officers. Admirals generally were awarded with silver vases worth several hundred £.

In another forum, we have been following an interesting discovery earlier this spring at a small museum, the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery. An inventory of their arms strongroom turned up a Lloyd's Patriotic Fund sword that was apparently presented to Lord Cochrane in 1806 in recognition of a particularly brilliant cutting out of a French corvette. The museum staff were puzzled at first, having little experience with naval objects, and not really sure who this Cochrane fellow was. An accompanying note says: 'The sword was presented to the Museum in 1875. It was previously in the hands of a dealer in naval swords, a Mr E Emanuel, but how he acquired it we do not know.'


Research of the LPF records show that six swords were definitely voted
for the Pallas action. Cochrane received the £100 sword. Lt Haswell and Master Sutherland received £50 swords. Three midshipmen, JC Crawford, E Perkyns, and WA Thompson were awarded £30 swords. A ledger listing of the LPF shows the other five swords being delivered to their recipients, but Cochrane's conspicuously undelivered.

There is no mention of this sword in Cochrane's autobiography or any
of the later biographies. The current Earl of Dundonald has been contacted, and has replied that the Cochrane family had no notion that an LPF sword had been awarded.


The other curious aspect of the sword is that the special inscription
has been deliberately removed from the blade and replaced with a
generic oak leaf design inconsistent with the decoration of the rest
of the blade. A ship's name, normally found on the scaboard, has been
similarly removed. Overlooked was the initial C engraved on the reverse side of the blade.

The last is significant. Of the 60 - 70 £100 LPF swords ever awarded, only three were for officers with last initial of C. Of these Codrington and Cumby were awarded a special Trafalgar pattern. The only non-Trafalgar C sword was Cochrane's.

Don Seltzer


Mon Jul 02, 2007 3:09 pm
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Don Seltzer wrote:
The LPF did award swords of £100 to captains, £50 and £30 to lesser officers. Admirals generally were awarded with silver vases worth several hundred £.

In another forum, we have been following an interesting discovery earlier this spring at a small museum, the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery.......



.... now, if I'd paid more attention to that thread and read it word for word - which I confess I did not - I'd have seen mention of the vases earlier instead of reading about them in The Times. :oops: :lol:

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Tue Jul 03, 2007 10:42 am
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A general bit of information from a footnote associated with Henry Rowed's bio in Volume IV of Marshall's Royal Naval Biography:

"The Patriotic Fund was established on the 20th July, 1803, between which period and Mar. 1st, 1820, the amount of subscriptions was £595,000; the greatest part of which appears to have been paid away in annuities and donations, swords, vases, and other honorary marks of distinction."

For an action involving the capture of a chasse-maree, Rowed was given the choice of a sword of £50 value w/ "suitable inscription" or money. John Marks, a boatswain, who also took part was awarded a silver call and chain, also with appropriate inscription.

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Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:37 pm
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The Times of April 4, 1822:,

" .... Mr Drake, midshipman of the Severn, has been recently presented with a rich gold medal, by the King of the Netherlands, for his humane and successful exertions in saving from a watery grave a Dutch sailor, one of the crew of a vessel lately wrecked on the Sussex coast, off Winchilsea - Kentish Gazette...."


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Fri Oct 19, 2007 12:42 pm
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From The Times, of February 5, 1801:

" ........ Lord Nelson, it appears, has entirely dropped the title of Duke of Bronte, conferred upon him by his Neopolitan Majesty, which is the more remarkable, as the last Gazette contains his Majesty's permission to Sir Thomas Trowbridge and other Naval Officers to assume and wear the title and ensignia of Knight of certain orders conferred upon them by the same Sovereign. ......"

Has any ideas on this one?





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Fri Nov 30, 2007 1:39 pm
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Until November 1800, Nelson signed his letters "Bronte Nelson" or "Bronte Nelson of the Nile". In November he was presented to the King wearing all his foreign orders and awards without having obtained formal permission to wear them. He was snubbed by the King, presumably as a consequence. Around this time he changed his signature to "Nelson of the Nile" and then just "Nelson". In January he received the royal licence to use his "Duke of Bronte" title, but much to his annoyance, it was not gazetted at the same time as Troubridge's and others' orders. Towards the end of January he started to sign himself "Nelson and Bronte".

The Times seems to be just slightly behind the times on this.

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Sun Dec 02, 2007 9:02 pm
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Tony wrote:
Until November 1800, Nelson signed his letters "Bronte Nelson" or "Bronte Nelson of the Nile". In November he was presented to the King wearing all his foreign orders and awards without having obtained formal permission to wear them. He was snubbed by the King, presumably as a consequence. Around this time he changed his signature to "Nelson of the Nile" and then just "Nelson". In January he received the royal licence to use his "Duke of Bronte" title, but much to his annoyance, it was not gazetted at the same time as Troubridge's and others' orders. Towards the end of January he started to sign himself "Nelson and Bronte".


Thanks for clarifying that, Tony....appreciated.

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Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:33 am
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From the bio of Richard John Head in Volume 4 of Marshall's Royal Naval Biography:

"...the officers of the Coast Guard, (Falmouth district), gave him a dinner, on his retiring from the duties of Inspecting Commander. At the same time, they presented him with a snuff-box, of heart of oak, manufactured from a beam of St. Mawe's castle, of 200 years standing, suitably ornamented, and with an inscription commemorative of the deep feelings of respect which they entertained of his public character as an officer, and in grateful testimony of the many courtesies they had individually received."

Quite a unique gift. I wonder what happened to it?

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Sat Dec 29, 2007 5:03 am
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From The Times, October 19, 1797:

" .... The medallions with the gold chain, similar to those which were given by his Majesty to some of the most distinguished Officers in Lord Howe's fleet, on the 1st June 1794, will be presented by the King to Admiral Onslow, and some of the other Officers who so nobly signalized themselves in the recent Victory over the Dutch . ....."





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Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:47 am
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From the bio of Henry Shovell Marsham in Marshall (Volume IV):

"Previous to his quitting the St. Vincent, the junior officers of that ship entertained him in very handsome style; the gun-room was fitted up in an elegant manner, sixty sat down to dinner, and a ball followed—altogether one of the best things of the kind ever witnessed."

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