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From A Tar of the Last War by the Rev. C.E. Armstrong, which is the story of Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Richardson:

The mids had purchased a monkey at the Cape of Good Hope.

"Jacko [monkey] became a source of daily amusement to his young friends, but fell a victim at length to his imitative propensities. A man, who was painting a hen-coop, went to his dinner, and the monkey, which had been attentively watching him for some time, slipped down the mast, and proceeded, with the utmost gravity, to finish the job. He had seen the painter put the end of the brush into his mouth while turning the coop, and Jacko, of course, though that he must do the same. Instead, however, of putting the handle into his mouth, he put the brush itself, full of red lead, and, consequently, swallowed a quantity of deadly poison. When the painter returned the poor monkey was lying down in great agony, and, before night, the pet of the ship was consigned to the deep by the sorrowful middies." :(

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Thu Sep 06, 2007 7:15 am
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The Times of October 25th, 1823, which was reporting on the return of the Hecla and the Fury from the North Pole, tells of:

" ....several dogs...fleecy full-grown animals, of the size and docility of the common Newfoundland breed; but with some of the appearance of the wolf species. They are the draught dogs of the natives, and perfectly tame and tractable, but at present suffering severely from the change of temperature....."

It also goes on to say that "....Captain Cook had a goat which sailed twice round the world -- the Hecla has an Orkney cat that accompanied the two polar expeditions, and a very fine Esquimaux dog, which had the same advantage, and now walks the deck unaffected by the change of temperature which affects his fellows of the same breed .... the sailors have also brought home some curious and very perfect specimens of the sea horse, the sea unicorn (to give the sailors application to that singular fish), a white fox, and several fowls of the partridge, penguin, and duck specie........"

They must have had quite a menagerie aboard, and I am particularly intrigued by the "Orkney cat". I've never heard of such a breed. Did the islands have their own type of cat - as does the Isle of Man; can anyone throw any light on that...any theories?

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Fri Sep 07, 2007 10:42 am
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Mil Goose wrote:
The Times of October 25th, 1823, which was reporting on the return of the Hecla and the Fury from the North Pole, tells of:

. . . several fowls of the partridge, penguin, and duck specie........"

They must have had quite a menagerie aboard, and I am particularly intrigued by the "Orkney cat". I've never heard of such a breed. Did the islands have their own type of cat - as does the Isle of Man; can anyone throw any light on that...any theories?


Not to mention the arctic penguin. I wonder if they meant an auk, or a puffin maybe.

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Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:49 pm
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Broos Campbell wrote:
Mil Goose wrote:
The Times of October 25th, 1823, which was reporting on the return of the Hecla and the Fury from the North Pole, tells of:

. . . several fowls of the partridge, penguin, and duck specie........"

They must have had quite a menagerie aboard, and I am particularly intrigued by the "Orkney cat". I've never heard of such a breed. Did the islands have their own type of cat - as does the Isle of Man; can anyone throw any light on that...any theories?


Not to mention the arctic penguin. I wonder if they meant an auk, or a puffin maybe.


....not quite what you were asking, Broos, but a search revealed this which I find equally interesting.

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Tue Sep 11, 2007 5:38 am
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Mil Goose wrote:
Broos Campbell wrote:
Not to mention the arctic penguin. I wonder if they meant an auk, or a puffin maybe.


....not quite what you were asking, Broos, but a search revealed this which I find equally interesting.


Ha ha! Next let's see if there's an antarctic polar bear.

"Auld Reekie" is an excellent name for a steamer, btw.

Broos

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Tue Sep 11, 2007 7:42 pm
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Broos Campbell wrote:
Mil Goose wrote:
The Times of October 25th, 1823, which was reporting on the return of the Hecla and the Fury from the North Pole, tells of:

. . . several fowls of the partridge, penguin, and duck specie........"

They must have had quite a menagerie aboard, and I am particularly intrigued by the "Orkney cat". I've never heard of such a breed. Did the islands have their own type of cat - as does the Isle of Man; can anyone throw any light on that...any theories?


Not to mention the arctic penguin. I wonder if they meant an auk, or a puffin maybe.


Great Auks were the original penguins. The antarctic birds were named for their resemblance to auks.

From Wikipedia:
"The Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis, formerly Alca impennis) is an extinct bird. It was the only species in the genus Pinguinus, flightless giant auks from the Atlantic, to survive until recent times, but is extinct today. It was also known as garefowl (from the Old Norse geirfugl, meaning "spear-bird", a reference to the shape of its beak), or penguin (see etymology below)."

Etymology

"One theory connects names for the Great Auk with the origin of the word penguin, which may have come from the Welsh or Breton phrase pen gwyn, meaning "white head". Although the head of the Great Auk was not white, there was a prominent white patch in front of the eye, commented on by writers such as Martin Martin. Later, when explorers discovered apparently similar birds in the southern hemisphere, those which we now call penguins, the term was supposedly transferred to them.

In French, auks are called "Pingouins" (a word close to Penguin) while Penguins (the southern birds) are called "Manchots" (a word meaning "armless"). Most French people still remain confused, calling Penguins "Pingouins" instead of "Manchots" as the two types of birds share many characteristics.

An alternative theory, suggested by John Latham in 1785, claims that the word penguin comes from the Latin pinguis ("fat"), referring to the plump appearance of the bird.

The specific name impennis means "lacking remiges" in Latin. The remiges (wing feathers) of this species were compact and small, and the wings were presumably used for propulsion under water, as they are by all modern auks and penguins."

-clash

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Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:00 pm
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clash wrote:
Great Auks were the original penguins. The antarctic birds were named for their resemblance to auks.


Thanks for the research. That makes more sense than what I first thought, that the auks were called penguins in confusion with the southern bird. Europeans would've seen auks quite a bit sooner than they saw penguins. The obscure is obvious, once it's explained. :?

I also understand that what we call a moose in North America is/was called an elk in Europe, and what we call an elk—i.e., the wapiti—was once thought to be a kind of red deer.

Broos

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Broos Campbell wrote:
clash wrote:
Great Auks were the original penguins. The antarctic birds were named for their resemblance to auks.


Thanks for the research. That makes more sense than what I first thought, that the auks were called penguins in confusion with the southern bird. Europeans would've seen auks quite a bit sooner than they saw penguins. The obscure is obvious, once it's explained. :?

I also understand that what we call a moose in North America is/was called an elk in Europe, and what we call an elk—i.e., the wapiti—was once thought to be a kind of red deer.

Broos


There's quite a few of them. Off the top of my head -
Same animals, different names:

Europe N. America

Elk Moose
Red Deer Elk/Wapiti
Reindeer Caribou
Guillemot Murre
Auklet Dovkie

-clash

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Tue Sep 11, 2007 10:40 pm
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clash wrote:
There's quite a few of them. Off the top of my head -
Same animals, different names:

Europe N. America

Elk Moose
Red Deer Elk/Wapiti
Reindeer Caribou
Guillemot Murre
Auklet Dovkie

-clash


And for same names, different animals:
American robin, which is actually a kind of thrush
pronghorn, which isn't an antelope, despite often being called that
what we call a buffalo is actually a bison

We do use the names guillemot and auklet, though, at least on the West Coast. I wonder if that's a reflection of usage by Peterson and other people who write birding guides, or if it represents an actual regional difference.

Broos

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Well no confusion here - this rather melancholy tale is definitely about a wolf. From the Naval Chronicle volume 37 p182-83, describing the wreck of the Minotaur on the Haak sands in December 1810:

"The fate of Lieutenant Salsford was distinguished by a singular circumstance: A large tame wolf, caught at Aspro, and brought up from a cub by the ship's company, and exceedingly docile, continued to the last an object of general solicitude. Sensible of its danger, its howls were peculiarly distressing. He had always been a particular favorite of the lieutenant, who was also greatly attached to the animal, and through the whole of their sufferings he kept close to his master. On the breaking up of the ship, both got upon the mast. At times they were washed off, but by each other's assistance regained it. The lieutenant at last became exhausted by continual exertion, and benumbed with cold. The wolf was equally fatigued, and both held occasionally by the other to retain his situation. When within a short distance of the land, Lieutenant Salsford, affected by the attachment of the animal, and totally unable any longer to support himself, turned towards him from the mast, the beast clapped his fore paws round his neck, while the lieutenant clasped him in his arms, and they sunk together."

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From The Life & Adventures of John Nicol, Mariner at Prince William Sound and as a cooper was brewing spruce and being hounded by the locals:

".....I was much annoyed by the natives for some time while working. They would handle the hoops..and then a piece would vanish...while they swarmed around I felt rather uncomfortable. The captain** seeing from the deck my disagreeable situation, hailed me to set Neptune, our great Newfoundland dog upon them.....I obeyed with alacrity and hounded Neptune, who enjoyed the sport as much as I, to see the great fellows run, screaming like girls, in all directions. I was soon left to pursue my labour unmolested...whenever they grew troublesome Neptune, without orders, put them to running and screaming....."


**Captain Portlock of the King George

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Mon Sep 17, 2007 8:22 am
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From Ten Months Among the Tents of the Tuski (1853) by WH Hooper:

"[Jack] was a sheep which had long survived his comrades with whom he had been brought on board at Plymouth, and had been reserved for Sir John Franklin in case of falling in with him; he had now travelled over 20,000 miles with us, and was a general pet. Jack had learned many tricks, would eat biscuits, almonds, and morsels of tobacco, and drank grog in the most creditable manner, and when in want of food or water would go to the hatchway and bleat loudly for his attendant, often even descending the ladder, which was steep and awkward."

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From William Stanhope Lovell's Personal Narrative of Events, from 1799 to 1815:

"One of the marine officers had a monkey on board, who used to amuse us with his gambols; but was rather fond of biting, for which he received occasionally a beating from us youngsters. This brought on a coolness between his master and us, and led at last to open war."

Lovell goes on to describe a prank they played on the marine using the monkey. As a result, "the monkey was sent out of the ship, on board a merchant vessel...his master having had quite enough of monkey tricks."

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Sun Oct 28, 2007 6:23 pm
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From Hercules Robinson in Sea Drift:

"......the flag-ship was returning from the West Indies. They were washing decks in the morning; the old admiral walking the break of the poop. On these occasions the pigs are indulged with a scrubbing and ablution. One of them, more curious as to scenery than was good for him, looking out of the port, fell into the sea.

.....'The admiral's pig is overboard'
'What is that you say?' said Flag.
'Your pig is overboard, sir.'
'Watch, shorten sail...clear way the quarter boat' .....

Whilst this was being done, another voice was heard from the waist - 'It is the midshipmen's black pig; it is not the admiral's'

The party interested caught the sound, and immediately cried out, 'It is no use, no use, no use; put the helm up; keep fast the quarter-boat....make sail again; keep her on course.....'

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From A Narrative of The Briton's Voyage to Pitcairn's Island (1817) by Royal Marine Lieutenant John Shillibeer:

"One of these creatures [tortoise] greatly exceeded the others in size.... From its having been taken at this Island, the sailors whimsically bestowed on it the name of Lord Chatham. It soon lost its natural shyness, became much petted among the crew, and latterly, was in regular attendance in the galley at the hour of meals, when it partook of the ships allowance, and was fed by the men either out of their hands or some of their utensils, but notwithstanding, every care was taken, its life could not be preserved in the excessive cold, of a high southern latitude."

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