View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Oct 21, 2017 3:03 am



Reply to topic  [ 80 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 Sea-Going Pets 
Author Message
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post Sea-Going Pets
Collingwood's affectionate descriptions of his faithful friend, Bounce, make his letters a joy to read. Basil Hall writes of monkeys and Jean the pig. She-goats were practical pets.

Does anyone have other examples they'd like to mention?

Did Nelson have a pet? I seem to remember reading something about a dog collar he had made. Maybe it was for Horatia's dog? (Or am I confused?)

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:07 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
More about a pet pig as quoted in Zachary Friedenberg's Medicine Under Sail. The "I" in the account is David Glasgow Farragut.

***

I saw at once that he [a British sailor] had under his arm a pet pig belonging to our ship [Essex] called, "Murphy." I claimed the animal as my own.

"Ah," said they, "but you are a prisoner and your pig also."

"We always respect private property," I replied as I seized hold of Murphy and determined not to let go unless compelled by superior force. This was fun for the oldsters who immediately sung out, "Go it, my little Yankee! If you can thrash Shorty, you shall have your pig."

"Agreed," said I.

A ring was formed in the open space and at it we went. I soon found that my opponent's pugilistic education did not come up to mine. In fact, he was no match for me, and was compelled to give up the pig. So I took master Murphy under my arm, feeling that I had in some degree wiped out the disgrace of our defeat.

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Mon Aug 08, 2005 3:25 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
From G.S. Parsons:

"And the Bear [refers to the captain of Parsons' ship] rolled off, accompanied by his dog, Phillis, who, in appearance, was worthy of her master, the ugliest cur, snappish and cross-grained; yet the beast had a hammock slung in the captain's cabin, and was most carefully put to bed at early hours."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Mon Aug 08, 2005 4:19 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
This is taken from A Selection from the Public and Private Correspondence of Vice-Admiral Lord Collingwood by G.L. Newnham Collingwood.

Collingwood writes to his wife:

"I am all out of patience with Bounce. The consequential airs he gives himself since has become a right honourable dog are insufferable. He considers it beneath his dignity to play with commoners' dogs, and truly thinks he does them grace when he condescends to lift up his leg against them. This, I think, is carrying the insolence of rank to the extreme; but he is a dog that does it."

:lol:

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
Profile YIM
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 6:58 am
Posts: 143
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Post 
susan wrote:
This is taken from A Selection from the Public and Private Correspondence of Vice-Admiral Lord Collingwood by G.L. Newnham Collingwood.

Collingwood writes to his wife:

"I am all out of patience with Bounce. The consequential airs he gives himself since has become a right honourable dog are insufferable. He considers it beneath his dignity to play with commoners' dogs, and truly thinks he does them grace when he condescends to lift up his leg against them. This, I think, is carrying the insolence of rank to the extreme; but he is a dog that does it."

:lol:


I loved a quote from Collingwood when writing about one of his officers: " He is about as much use to me as an officer as Bounce, and Bounce is more entertaining".

I'm just about finished the Max Adams biography of Collingwood. Very enjoyable read.

Cheers


Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:43 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
LizMc wrote:
I loved a quote from Collingwood when writing about one of his officers: " He is about as much use to me as an officer as Bounce, and Bounce is more entertaining".

LOL! Was he referring to Captain Rotheram?

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Oct 01, 2005 10:02 pm
Profile YIM
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2005 6:58 am
Posts: 143
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Post 
susan wrote:
LizMc wrote:
I loved a quote from Collingwood when writing about one of his officers: " He is about as much use to me as an officer as Bounce, and Bounce is more entertaining".

LOL! Was he referring to Captain Rotheram?


I'll have to see if I can find the quote again, but no, he wasn't......If I remember correctly, he was refering to a junor officer imposed on him by a family connection........the officer didn't stick around though........

Collingwood did have a delightful, dry wit........

Cheers


Sun Oct 02, 2005 12:59 am
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
LizMc wrote:

Collingwood did have a delightful, dry wit........





.... a Northern wit, presumably .... regions have their own wit, as they do dialect.

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sun Oct 02, 2005 6:51 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
I know some of you have seen this before, but I thought I'd post it here again because I like it. :D It's part of Basil Hall's story of Jean the pig.

***

In warm latitudes, the men, as I have mentioned before, generally take their meals on deck, and it was Jean’s grand amusement, as well as business, to cruise along amongst the messes, poking her snout into every bread-bag, and very often she scalded her tongue in the soup-kids. Occasionally, the sailors, to show the extent of their regard, amused themselves by pouring a drop of grog down her throat. I never saw her fairly drunk, however, but twice; upon which occasions, as was to be expected, she acted pretty much like a human being in the same hoggish predicament. Whether it was owing to this high feeding, or to the constant scrubbing which her hide received from sand, brushes, and holystones, I know not, but she certainly grew and flourished at a most astonishing rate, and every day waxed more and more impudent and importunate at the dinner-hour. I saw a good deal of this familiarity going on, but had no idea of the estimation Jean was held in, till one day, when we were about half-way across the China Sea, and all our stock of sheep, fowls and ducks, was expended, I said to the steward, “You had better kill the pig, which, if properly managed, will last till we reach Macao.”

The servant stood for some time fumbling with his hair, and shuffling with his feet, mumbling something to himself.

“Don’t you hear?” I asked. “Kill the pig; and let us have the fry to-day, the head, with plenty of port wine, as mock-turtle soup, to-morrow, and get one of the legs roasted for dinner on Saturday.”

Off he went; but in half-an-hour returned, on some pretence or other, when he took occasion to ask,—“Did you say Jean was to be killed, sir?”

“Jean! Who is Jean?—Oh, now I remember; the pig. Yes, certainly. Why do you bother and boggle so about killing a pig?”

“The ship’s company, sir—“

“Well; what have the ship’s company to say to my pig?”

“They are very fond of Jean, sir.”

“The devil they are! Well; what then?”

“Why, sir, they would take it as a great kindness if you would not order her to be killed. She is a great pet, sir, and comes to them when they call her by name, like a dog. They have taught her not to venture abaft the mainmast; but if you only call her, you’ll see that what I say is true.”

“Indeed! I’ll soon try that experiment;” and seized my hat to go on deck.

“Shall I tell the butcher to hold fast:” asked Capewell.

“Of course!” I exclaimed. “Of course!”

Off shot the steward like an arrow; and I could soon distinguish the effect of the announcement, by the intermission of those horrible screams which ever attend the execution of the pig tribe, all which sounds were instantly terminated on the seizings being cut that tied poor Jean’s legs.

On reaching the quarter-deck, I told what had passed to the officer of the watch, who questioned its propriety a little, I thought, by the tone of his answer. I, however, called out “Jean! Jean!” and in a moment the delighted pig came prancing along. So great, in fact, was her anxiety to answer the call, as if to show her sense of the trifling favour I had just conferred upon her, that she dashed towards us, tripping up the officer’s heels, and had I not caught him, he would have come souse on the deck. Even as it was, he indulged in a growl, and muttered out,—“You see, sir, what your yielding to such whims brings upon us.”

I said nothing, and only took care in the future to caution my friends to mind their footing when Jean was summoned aft, which, I allow, was very often; for there was no resisting the exhibition to all strangers of such a patent pet as this.

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sun Oct 02, 2005 8:19 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
From Reminiscences of a Naval Officer by Abraham Crawford, this is part of an account of a young bear given to Benjamin Hallowell by the Baron d'Erolles:

"It not unfrequently happened that, in attending to some duty on deck, the first intimation one had of Bruin being at hand, was finding your leg tightly clasped in the arms of the brute. This was by way of play; but it was a rough and unseasonable interruption, and sure to set Jack grinning, who chuckled to see the officer in limbo, and one that you could not easily shake off; for if you struck him, or even scolded him sharply, there was danger that he would resent the indignity, and in a manner that might not be at all agreeable. So the wisest way was to endure patiently, and let him enjoy his gambols unmolested, which seldom lasted long."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Wed Oct 19, 2005 6:58 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
More from Basil Hall:

"Half-a-dozen of these [young alligators] were kept in tubs of water at the Admiralty House for many days, the rest being carried on board, became great favourties amongst the sailors, whose queer taste in the choice of pets has already been noticed."

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:35 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
I notice in Pocock's Remember Nelson, - The Life and Times of Sir William Hoste that Hoste had a dog called "Brontë" (no prizes for guessing why he was so named ;)) with him on board the Eurydice.

Hoste hunted with the dog in the Cape Verde islands and describes in a letter to one of his brothers wrote about " ... his own rough shoots at Goree, when he and his officers, and his old dog Brontë .... shot 'wild turkeys and guinea fowls by dozens!' ...." and " ....'What a jump from Old England across the Atlantic,' he added, 'and what a contrast between old Brontë and a flock of turkeys, and your favourite dog Gull and a covey of partridges!' ...."

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:47 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
Henry Nottidge Moseley from Notes by a Naturalist on the "Challenger" on Robert the parrot, who was purchased from a ship bound for Liverpool:

"'Robert' survived all the extremes of the heat and cold of the voyage and perils of all kind, from heavy tumbles, driving gales of wind, and the falling about of books and furniture. He had one of his legs crippled, and his feathers never grew properly, but he was perfectly happy, and from his perch, which was one of the wardroom hat-pegs, he talked away and amused us during the whole voyage. His great triumph, constantly repeated, was 'What! two thousand fathoms and no bottom? Ah Doctor Carpenter, F.R.S.' He knew his own name perfectly, and I have known him climb over the ledge in at the door of the cabin of Dr. Maclean, his chief friend, when I have been sitting there on a dark rough night, after he had come to grief and tumbled off his perch with a thump, plaintively appealing with 'Robert,' 'Robert.'"

And another bird tale (ha-ha):

"After leaving the Aru Islands a young Cassowary roamed about the decks for some time, but was soon killed as a nuisance. No doubt, had it not been killed, it would soon have committed suicide, like an Ostrich on board one of the men-of-war at the Cape, which stole a piece of hot iron put down by the blacksmith beside his forge, and swallowed it hastily with fatal effect."

And on spider specimens/pets:

"I fed the Spiders on Cockroaches. One of them escaped, but it was brought back to me after a week by Captain Maclear, rather crushed, he having discovered it with his toe in the extremity of one of his boots." (oh dear!)

Monkeys:

"We should have liked to have had a pet Monkey with us, but Monkeys are strictly forbidden, by a special Admiralty regulation, on surveying ships, because one once destroyed a valuable chart which had just been completed with great labour. Even a Marmoset, which I bought at Bahia, was considered to come under the regulation and perished in consequence."

For the POB fans...Sloth:

"On the quay [at Bahia] I bought a living full-grown Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) from a countryman for two shillings. We kept the animal alive in our work-room for some days, where it hung on to the book shelves and bottle racks, and crawled about. As I could not get it to feed, I had to kill it." (poor thing!)

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:40 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
susan wrote:

For the POB fans...Sloth:

"On the quay [at Bahia] I bought a living full-grown Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus tridactylus) from a countryman for two shillings. We kept the animal alive in our work-room for some days, where it hung on to the book shelves and bottle racks, and crawled about. As I could not get it to feed, I had to kill it." (poor thing!)




..... enjoyed that! I can't think of sloths without remembering Jack Aubrey! :D

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:11 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
I wonder when the regulation regarding monkeys went into effect. BHall thought monkeys were amusing and made it a point to have one on board when he could. He obviously did not have one of his charts torn up! :)

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:56 pm
Profile YIM
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 80 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.