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 Naval Hospitality 
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Post Naval Hospitality
From Volume III of James Scott's Recollections of a Naval Life:

"The friendly welcome of most naval messes, notwithstanding the inconvenience attendant on the admission of strangers, is universally known and acknowledged..."

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Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:29 am
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From Volume II, Series I of Basil Hall's Fragments of Voyages and Travels, Hall's account of events after Corunna. A boat came alongside Endymion with some army officers looking for Transport No. 139. Since no one knew exactly where that particular vessel was at the moment, they were invited on board.

"So we sent away their little boat, and just at that moment the gun-room steward announced breakfast. We invited our new friends down, and gave them a hearty meal in peace and comfort—a luxury they had not enjoyed for many a long and rugged day.

"Our next care was to afford our tired warriors the much-required comforts of a razor and clean linen. We divided the party amongst us; and I was so much taken with one of these officers, that I urged him to accept such accomodation as my cabin and wardrobe afforded. He had come to us without one stitch of clothes beyond what he then wore, and these, to say the truth, were not in the best condition, at the elbows and other angular points of his frame. Let that pass,—he was as fine a fellow as ever stepped; and I had much pride and pleasure in taking care of him during the passage."

Hall's new friend, William de Lancey, eventually ended up marrying Hall's sister, Magdalene. De Lancey was mortally wounded at Waterloo.

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Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:53 am
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From Sea Drift by Hercules Robinson:

"....dinners and entertainments abounded on shore and afloat. Sir Home Popham kept up a handsome state on board the Minden, and everywhere our good allies, as well as our own countrymen, were vying in doing honor to the great visitor....."

Out of interest, the 'visitor' was Lord Hastings, the Governor-General of India, visiting Madeira.

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Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:56 am
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From the The Times, July 6, 1799:

" .... SHEERNESS, July 22: the reciprocal attentions that have passed between the Russian Admiral Mackeroff, and the late Commander in Chief Admiral Mitchell, have created an understanding between the Naval Officers of both nations at this place, which has proved highly pleasant to all; and in actual service might bring with it public good. A most superb dinner was given by Admiral Mackeroff to Admiral Mitchell and the Captains of his fleet; and this was returned on Friday last by our Admiral. The ships were manned, and every mark of honour and respect mutually shewn ...."




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Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:07 am
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Post Impromptu hospitality
Oliver Warner, in 'Nelson's Battles', quotes Theophilus Lee's account of Davidge Gould's hospitality when a salvage operation failed. A young mid of only 10 years had been involved and 'after an hour's exhausting pull, they reached the Audacious, the nearest ship.

'Our young mid. on getting on board, said to Captain Gould that he hoped he would tell Captain Hallowell that he had done all in his power to save the yard; and the reply from that worthy man was: 'Do not fear, my fine little fellow, I watched you till dark with a spy glass, and since that, I entertained serious fears that you had all gone together; however, I am delighted to see you safe. Come into my cabin and get refreshment and lay down on my sofa for the night, and I will send a letter by you in the morning to your excellent captain, telling him how hard you struggled to save the spar........'

Gould and his first lieutenant added to their kindness by housing the Swiftsure seamen snugly for the night'.


Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:19 pm
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Post Re: Naval Hospitality
susan wrote:
From Volume III of James Scott's Recollections of a Naval Life:

"The friendly welcome of most naval messes, notwithstanding the inconvenience attendant on the admission of strangers, is universally known and acknowledged..."


Things don't change much ........ :wink:

Andrea

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Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:42 pm
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From The Times, September 25th, 1786:

".... On Thursday evening last the Duke and Duchess of Milan arrived at Portsmouth, and Friday morning went round the harbour, attended by Lord Hood and all the Captains at that port; after going on board the Victory, and surveying most of the parts of that ship, they repaired on board the Triumph of 74 guns, the Admiral's ship, where an elegant breakfast was provided after which they landed at the Dock-yard to survey the shipping and storehouses. Their Highnesses seemed highly pleased with the grandeur of the spectacle. .... "


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Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:09 am
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From the Army and Navy Chronicle (5 Oct 1837) - Vol. V No. 14

"A striking proof of the good feelings which have subsisted between the ship's company of the French frigate Dryade, and that of the British line-of-battle ship Malabar, both at Lisbon, may here be mentioned: these ships have been nearly fourteen months together; and the crew of the Dryade having heard that the Malabar was on the point of returning to England to be paid off, sent an invitation to the crew of the latter, or a part of them, to dine with them on board the Dryade. The invitation having been accepted, a splendid repast, in the true French style, with an abundance of wine, was provided...In return for this hospitality, and to mark their sense also of the cordial feelings that had existed between the crews of these ships, an invitation to dinner from the seamen of the Malabar was given to those of the Dryade...three hundred of the crew of the latter dined on board the Malabar, on which occasion all the main deck guns were run in fore and aft, the tables being spread the length of the main deck, which was screened in with flags, the French and English ensigns being folded in valances, and placed at the head of the table. The viands consisted of beef, mutton, poultry, &c., and plum pudding. ...at the request of the seamen of the Dryade, they were shown round the Malabar, and during their temporary absence from the main deck, the remains of the substantial fare were removed, and replaced by fruits of every kind, and wine; nor was grog introduced until a late hour; each party separating delighted at the mutual display of cordiality between them." (from Hampshire Telegraph)

Sounds like they all had a grand time!

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Thu Sep 24, 2009 9:13 am
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The Times, October 13th, 1785:

" .... Monday an elegant dinner was given at the Fountain Inn, Portsmouth, to his Royal Highness Prince William Henry by the Lieutenants of the Navy at this Port; early in the evening the Prince left them to be present at a ball given by the Commissioners in the dock-yard: the Prince until yesterday was absent from his ship a few days on a visit to Lord Hood, at his seat at Catherington. ...."



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Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:38 pm
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Post Re: Naval Hospitality
From The history of Lord Seaton's Regiment, (the 52nd Light Infantry) at the Battle of Waterloo (1866) by William Leeke:

"...as four of us were pulling in the ship's boat up the harbour, they hailed us from the Egeria and begged us to come on board. This we did in our shirt sleeves, for we had left our coats in the transport. The officers invited us to go below and take a glass of wine, which we consented to do; but we were not expecting to find a somewhat large party assembled. After some little time some of them proposed that, as we were without our coats, they should doff theirs also, out of respect to us. This the first lieutenant resisted at first, as it was contrary to the etiquette of the service that they should do so at their mess table, but at last he consented, and was the first to throw off his own coat. They gave several toasts, and the noise which was made must have been heard over the whole harbour and town. When we went on deck, the seamen sang several songs for our amusement."

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Post Re: Naval Hospitality
The Times, July 31st, 1799:

" ........... Admiral Rainier gave an elegant entertainment March last to Lord and Lady Clive, and several of the most distinguished personages in Madras. The ships being off St Thome, were dressed on the occasion, and the whole was conducted with the greatest magnificence and splendour. ....... "

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