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 Food and Drink 
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IONIA wrote:
One authority has it that he retired from the Royal Marines as a Lieutenant General but I have not been able to confirm this.

Looking at his obit in the Gentleman's Magazine, it says Lieutenant-General (1821). However, the rank may have been an army one (?).

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susan


Tue Feb 19, 2008 5:25 pm
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From A Narrative of The Briton's Voyage to Pitcairn's Island (1817) by Royal Marine Lieutenant John Shillibeer:

"Guanas [sic] we found here [Charles Is.] in great abundance, and notwithstanding their disgusting appearance, they were eaten by many of the sailors, who esteemed them as most delicious food."

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Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:32 am
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From The Times, November 14, 1799:

".... Yesterday morning, Mr Brown, Surgeon, of Hatton-garden, accompanied by a Person of distinction, waited on Mr Pitt, at his house in Downing-street, for the purpose of laying before the Minister a Plan for furnishing the Navy and Army, as well as Publicans and private Families, with Porter, of a very superior quality, and at a reduced price to which they now buy it.

Mr Brown could not have seized a more favourable opportunity for his purpose than the present critical moment, when there is such an universal and very just complaint made by all classes of individuals of the balderdash liquor now sold, and the price of which is again, raised: from the reports which have reached us of the fine flavour, and medicinal qualities of the Brilliant, the name by which this new Porter is known, and the high character given it by Mr Brown in his letter to Lord Spencer, we cannot but wish him that success to which his exertions for the public good so justly entitle him ......"



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Thu Jun 19, 2008 10:44 am
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I have a copy of an article written by Mary F. Williamson called "The publication of 'Mrs. Dalgairns' Cookery': a fortuitous nineteenth-century success story" (2007) from the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada.

Williamson writes about the relationship between Basil Hall and Mrs. Catherine Emily Dalgairns and the lengths he went to help her get her book published. Along the way, according to Williamson, Hall managed to slip one of his own recipes into the book.

Thanks to Google, I tracked it down. It's not much of a recipe but it amused me. :D

***

Captain Hall's Sandwiches for Travellers

SPREAD butter, very thinly, upon the upper part of a stale loaf of bread cut very smooth, and then cut off the slice; now cut off another thin slice, but spread it with butter on the under side, without which precaution the two slices of bread will not fit one another. Next take some cold beef, or ham, and cut it into very minute particles. Sprinkle these thickly over the butter, and, having added a little mustard, put the slices face to face, and press them together. Lastly, cut the whole into four equal portions, each of which is to be wrapped in a separate piece of paper.

***

We take sliced bread for granted! :D

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susan


Thu Jun 19, 2008 9:37 pm
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He must have heard of this idea from the Earl of Sandwich, who is credited with the 'invention' of the, er, sandwich.

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Fri Jun 20, 2008 7:44 am
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susan wrote:

Captain Hall's Sandwiches for Travellers

SPREAD butter, very thinly, upon the upper part of a stale loaf of bread cut very smooth, and then cut off the slice; now cut off another thin slice, but spread it with butter on the under side, without which precaution the two slices of bread will not fit one another. Next take some cold beef, or ham, and cut it into very minute particles. Sprinkle these thickly over the butter, and, having added a little mustard, put the slices face to face, and press them together. Lastly, cut the whole into four equal portions, each of which is to be wrapped in a separate piece of paper.



... I wonder if he was using good old East Anglian mustard - Colman's - which was about at the time, and, of course, sandwiches would still have been something of a novelty then, being a fairly new concept.

I love the "minute particles"; he was obviously a thrifty Scotsman. ;)


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Fri Jun 20, 2008 9:47 am
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Devenish wrote:
He must have heard of this idea from the Earl of Sandwich, who is credited with the 'invention' of the, er, sandwich.

Actually, the concept of the "sandwich" existed before the time of the Earl. I'm not a big fan of Wikipedia, but here's the link: Sandwich

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susan


Sat Jun 21, 2008 5:53 am
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From Brenton's Naval History of Great Britain (Vol. I):

"I remember well, when a midshipman in a 64 gun ship, coming home from India, cracking nuts by the working of the ship; we put them in under the knees as she rolled one way, and snatched them out as she rolled back again..."

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Wed Dec 03, 2008 8:54 am
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Post Re: Rum with that bit of extra kick...
Broos,

A rather delayed action reply to your query about bodies being sent home in spirits. From my work on S America, I know of two instances
1. that of Cochrane's one year old daughter Elizabeth, who died in Peru in April 1821 whose body returned to England in HMS 'Andromache' with Lady Kitty and her siblings
2. that of HM Consul General Mr Rowcroft who arrived in Lima on HMS 'Cambridge' in December 1824; was immediately shot in an altercation with jumpy security forces; and was then shipped home in the storeship 'Arab'.

Some naval officers died on the station but as far as I know - including Capt Thomas Graham of HMS 'Doris' - they were buried locally.

Brian Vale


Thu Dec 04, 2008 12:15 pm
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Post Re: Rum with that bit of extra kick...
Brian Vale wrote:
A rather delayed action reply to your query about bodies being sent home in spirits. From my work on S America, I know of two instances


Thanks, Brian. I disrecall my exact query, but I expect I wondered how often it actually happened, beyond the case of You Know Who. I appreciate the update.

Wait a minute ... Brian Vale the historian? One meets the most astonishing people on this forum.

Broos

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From Voyages Up the Mediterranean and in the Indian Seas; with Memoirs, Compiled from the Logs and Letters of a Midshipman (1837) by John Heraud:

"My mother thought we should have nothing to eat but salt meat. I dare say you will be astonished when you hear, that during the time I have been on board, I have had nothing but goose, chickens, and roasting pigs, each in its turn for dinner, and hams and tongues for breakfast, with salt-fish, &c.—To tell the truth, we rival the gun-room mess. The port wine we have is exceedingly good, allowing myself to be a judge."

The midshipman was William Robinson.

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Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:01 am
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susan wrote:
From Voyages Up the Mediterranean and in the Indian Seas; with Memoirs, Compiled from the Logs and Letters of a Midshipman (1837) by John Heraud:

"My mother thought we should have nothing to eat but salt meat. I dare say you will be astonished when you hear, that during the time I have been on board, I have had nothing but goose, chickens, and roasting pigs, each in its turn for dinner, and hams and tongues for breakfast, with salt-fish, &c.—To tell the truth, we rival the gun-room mess. The port wine we have is exceedingly good, allowing myself to be a judge."

The midshipman was William Robinson.




.... and there is me thinking the poor souls had to survive on mice and rats! :D


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Thu Feb 26, 2009 11:34 am
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More from William Robinson, written while his ship was at Malta:

"We had some lamb and salt beef; but the dessert far surpassed our dinner; for the small sum of sixpence we had a plate of grapes, of green figs, of nectarines, of peaches and apples. The grapes are a penny a pound; one bunch is about the size of this side of the paper I am writing on; each grape measured about an inch and a half round in length; they are exceedingly fine, and so are the green figs, and the prickly pears are very good, but unpleasant to get at, being covered with small prickles, which prick worse than the stinging nettle."

And later on at Derna:

"He [the Bey] has now send off two bullocks, bread, dates, eggs, pumpkins, carrots, and lemons; no bad things, I assure you, for hungry mids, who have been on salt junk for a month or two. All our stock being out, Lieut. Slater and young Bush went on shore to day (11th Dec.) at Derna, and brought off a large sheep for the mids, which cost but 7s. 6d. Bullocks here cost about ten dollars."

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Thu Mar 05, 2009 8:01 am
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The Times, October 26, 1791:

" ... PORTSMOUTH, April 24 .... This morning came up the Romulus man of war, from Guernsey, with wine for the fleet. ...."



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Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:41 am
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Mil Goose wrote:
.... and there is me thinking the poor souls had to survive on mice and rats! :D

A comment from Sir John Ross' bio of James Saumarez (1838), Volume I, p. 20:

"The midshipmen of the present day can have but a faint idea of the hardships and privations of a naval aspirant's life at the period Saumarez entered the service. Biscuits with insects, and tainted meat, was the usual fare when at sea at their mess-table; and none would have thought of procuring such luxuries as are now indispensable necessaries to their successors in the service."

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Sat Mar 07, 2009 7:49 am
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