View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:12 pm



Reply to topic  [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 Winds and Weather 
Author Message
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:34 am
Posts: 1471
Location: Virginia, USA
Post White Squall storm
My post about the movie "White Squall" (1996) brought to my attention a weather phenomenon called a "white squall," supposedly very rare (maybe even mythical) in blue water. It appears to be more common in the Great Lakes of North America

I somehow doubt that a novelist could easily work such a storm into a story since the ship would likely not survive, but it certainly would be an interesting detail.

Click Here for more information.

_________________
Don Campbell
"Whoever is strongest at sea, make him your friend."
Corcyraeans to the Athenians, 433 BC


Thu Nov 13, 2008 6:10 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 2:32 pm
Posts: 2960
Location: Hawaii
Post 
White squalls are mentioned in AoS accounts (Basil Hall among others) and has been used by POB: Patrick O'Brian and Basil Hall (scroll down to second post)

_________________
I have the honour to be, &c.
susan


Thu Nov 13, 2008 6:48 pm
Profile YIM
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:34 am
Posts: 1471
Location: Virginia, USA
Post 
susan wrote:
White squalls are mentioned in AoS accounts (Basil Hall among others) and has been used by POB: Patrick O'Brian and Basil Hall (scroll down to second post)

Thanks Susan. I must have missed the Hall/O'Brian post when I did a search.

_________________
Don Campbell
"Whoever is strongest at sea, make him your friend."
Corcyraeans to the Athenians, 433 BC


Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:11 pm
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 




The Times, October 26th, 1802:

" ... By letters from Newfoundland of the 10th ult. we learn, that Admiral Gambier's squadron experienced, in its passage out, a very violent gale of wind. It appeared indeed more like a hurricane that a common gale. It came on so suddenly, that every sail on board the Admiral's ship was blown to rags; they were obliged to cut away the mizen-mast; the main-top-mast was carried away, and the ship rendered a perfect wreck in about ten minutes. No person on board the ship had ever witnessed such a storm. The Aurora, which was in company with the Admiral, lost all her top-masts, and sprung her fore-yard. In this state the ships parted company, each supposing the other lost. ....."


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Wed Apr 22, 2009 10:10 am
Profile YIM
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2009 11:01 pm
Posts: 3
Post Question for Bonifacio Strait
Hi there!
I would like to know if there is any particular information about the weather or the streams concerning the Bonifacio Strait (between Sardinia and Corsica).

Thanks in advance.

_________________
Land Ahoy!


Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:44 pm
Profile
Commander

Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:27 am
Posts: 389
Location: Australia
Post Re: Question for Bonifacio Strait
Pegasus wrote:
Hi there!
I would like to know if there is any particular information about the weather or the streams concerning the Bonifacio Strait (between Sardinia and Corsica).

Thanks in advance.


For an 1841 description see:
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=waa ... n#PPA77,M1

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=waa ... n#PPA94,M1 (Intermediate Islands)

Tidal streams are not usually a factor in the Mediterranean because of the lack of tidal movement (as you will know well from Greece).

There is a general counter-clockwise current in the Western Basin of the Mediterranean (similar to that in the Aegean Sea). In Bonifacio Strait there is a weak west going current less than 50% of the time in November, December and January and with a rate of about 15 nm per 24 hrs. For the remainder of the year the currents are weak and variable and are mainly influenced by the winds e.g. after a NW gale there can be an east going current of up to 2 knots.

In winter strong winds blow frequently in Bonifacio Strait - usually from east or west. High seas may be expected in the western approaches in strong westerlies and in the eastern approaches with strong easterlies.

The best shelter for a frigate would be in Lord Nelson's anchorage - Agincourt Sound (still Agincourt on French charts, I think, but on Italian charts probably Mezzo Schifo) south of La Maddalena.


Thu Apr 23, 2009 12:49 am
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 




The Times, October 8th, 1800:

" ... FROM THE PARIS PAPERS..... Vigo, Sept. 7 ... On the 6th a ship of 74 guns, belonging to the English fleet, was driven ashore by a violent gale from the North-west. The enemy set fire to her, and the explosion shook all the houses of Vigo. In the same gale a cutter, a sloop, and a transport were lost. We know not whether the crews were saved; only four men and a women got ashore here and were saved...... (Journal des défenseurs ) ...."


Can anyone identify the 74?


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Fri May 01, 2009 10:48 am
Profile YIM
Commander

Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:27 am
Posts: 389
Location: Australia
Post 
The ship lost in Vigo Bay was the frigate STAG 32. She went ashore on 6th September in gale-force winds after her anchor cables parted and she was unable to beat out. She was destroyed on the following day by her crew setting her alight.


Fri May 01, 2009 11:03 am
Profile
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
IONIA wrote:
The ship lost in Vigo Bay was the frigate STAG 32. She went ashore on 6th September in gale-force winds after her anchor cables parted and she was unable to beat out. She was destroyed on the following day by her crew setting her alight.



...thanks, Peter; just like today, the accuracy of the report got corrupted en route. :)


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sat May 02, 2009 12:22 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 


The Times, January 21st, 1789:

" ..... Last night the Crown man of war lately came out of dock, after having the damage she received on the Goodwin Sands repaired, was drove from her moorings with the hulk she was fastened to, and was drifted against the shear hulk. About three this morning, with the assistance of the people in ordinary, she was again brought to anchor, not however, without the loss of her poop, lanterns, stern gallery, &c. . ..... "


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sun Jul 26, 2009 8:23 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 


The Times, October 21st, 1791:

" .... PLYMOUTH DOCK, October 18 .... Last night we had a very heavy and tremendous gale of wind from the South West; about ten o'clock the ships in the harbour struck their yards and topmasts, by a signal from the Admiral. From the violence with which the gale raged till four o'clock this morning, it is feared much damage will be sustained by the ships in the Channel. ...."




_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:51 am
Profile YIM
Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2008 1:48 pm
Posts: 151
Location: South Cambridgeshire, UK
Post 
Mil Goose wrote:


The Times, October 21st, 1791:

" .... PLYMOUTH DOCK, October 18 .... Last night we had a very heavy and tremendous gale of wind from the South West; about ten o'clock the ships in the harbour struck their yards and topmasts, by a signal from the Admiral. From the violence with which the gale raged till four o'clock this morning, it is feared much damage will be sustained by the ships in the Channel. ...."






Did later issues of The Times print any followup on this? I have a met office photocopy of "Historic storms of the North Sea, British Isles ..." and nothing major is listed between March 1791 and December 1792.

The most famous storm recorded in recent times must be the Great Storm of 1703 which was written up by Daniel Defoe. It started about 26-27 November 1703, lasted in the London and south-east of England until about 1st December 1703 (Old Style) and in other parts of the British Isles until 7-8 December. It is famous for destroying many warships of the Royal Navy, particularly the RESOLUTION which was driven ashore near Pevensey Bay/Beachy Head (apparently with no loss of life), and STIRLING CASTLE, NORTHUMBERLAND and RESTORATION, all lost on the Goodwin Sands with heavy loss of life. It is estimated that 1300 - 1500 seamen drowned in that storm. A tidal surge on Sunday 28 November damaged or sank most of the vessels in the Thames. Henry Winstanley had earlier gone out to the lighthouse that he had built on the Eddystone Rocks between 1696-98; at some time between the evening of Friday 26 November and the next morning the lighthouse, and Winstanley, disappeared without trace. Apart from Defoe's book about the storm, there have been several recent meterorological analyses of the conditions that led to the storm, e.g: "London Weather" by J.H. Brazell (Meteorological Office; HMSO 1968) and the met office document by H.H. Lamb, published in 1991, referred to above.

Martin


Thu Aug 13, 2009 8:54 pm
Profile WWW
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 


The Times, February 2nd, 1795:

" .... The Squirrel frigate is frozen up in Margate Bay. Margate Road forms a continued sheet of ice, a circumstance never before remembered.. ...."




_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Sat Aug 15, 2009 11:05 am
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post 
Martin Evans wrote:
Mil Goose wrote:


The Times, October 21st, 1791:

" .... PLYMOUTH DOCK, October 18 .... Last night we had a very heavy and tremendous gale of wind from the South West; about ten o'clock the ships in the harbour struck their yards and topmasts, by a signal from the Admiral. From the violence with which the gale raged till four o'clock this morning, it is feared much damage will be sustained by the ships in the Channel. ...."






Did later issues of The Times print any followup on this? I have a met office photocopy of "Historic storms of the North Sea, British Isles ..." and nothing major is listed between March 1791 and December 1792.

Martin





I will check it out, Martin, when I get a min, and let you know.


_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:22 pm
Profile YIM
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2002 9:02 am
Posts: 2747
Location: Cambridgeshire, England
Post Re: Winds and Weather
The Times, October 17th, 1789:

" ........... Lerwick, Sept.18... On the 10th inst, the Union Snow, Campbell, of and from Galloway to Memel, in ballast, put into Se'iboe, on the south west side of Shetland, in distress, having, through very heavy storms of wind, lost her masts, sails, &c. Mr Campbell has been much relieved by the assistance of Captain Taylor, of his Majesty's ship Thorn.. ...... "

_________________
- Mil -
aka Mary ....


Mon Feb 14, 2011 3:11 pm
Profile YIM
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 38 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.