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 Gover Gun 
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Post Gover Gun
I was just reading about this gun in Nicholas Blake's Steering to Glory. Does anyone know of a source that discusses it in more detail?

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susan


Wed Nov 15, 2006 7:50 am
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Chris Henry and Brian Delf cover this in Napoleonic Naval Armaments, 1792-1815 (Osprey) but to what extent I don't know. It may tell you nothing than you have already read. I hope to get the book eventually -- aways a long wish list. :lol:

As far as I can make out the weapon was short and light and was not able to be double-shotted. It would be interesting to find out more, as you are trying to do.

Also, William James in Vol.1V, pages 403 and 404, in his naval history of Great Britain also gives details.

This was John Gover I believe, and interestingly, in the Mechanics' Magazine in 1855 reference patents, a Daniel Gover has an entry regarding " .. improvements in the construction of gun-carriages and appliances connected therewith...."

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Fri Nov 17, 2006 2:05 pm
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Post Re: Gover Gun
susan wrote:
I was just reading about this gun in Nicholas Blake's Steering to Glory. Does anyone know of a source that discusses it in more detail?
There is one paragraph about a 24-pounder gun designed by Captain Gover on page 108 of "The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War 1600-1815" by Brian Lavery. As Mary notes above, it was lighter than a normal 24-pounder (33 cwt vs. 47 cwt). It was first used on the frigate Narcissus in 1805. It goes on to mention "Gover-pattern" guns were used for other ships afterward. The comments are located near the end of the section on carronades. Maybe, just maybe, when naval history books speak of carronades being added to RN ships, they were discussing a particular style of carronade designed by Gover? Especially when there were some problems with the initial carronade design (so short that the flaming embers from the discharge caught the sails on fire, for example). Interesting subject.

Don


Fri Nov 17, 2006 7:09 pm
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Thanks for the references, Mil and Don.

From what I understand, the Gover gun was not considered a carronade. The reference in James, that Mil noted, is helpful. There is a table comparing a regular long gun, a Gover gun, and a carronade of the same caliber (24-pounder).

James also mentions two other types of shorter guns: the Congreve and Blomefield.

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Sat Nov 18, 2006 9:50 pm
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Post Gover Guns
Mil Goose wrote:
Also, William James in Vol.1V, pages 403 and 404, in his naval history of Great Britain also gives details.
susan wrote:
From what I understand, the Gover gun was not considered a carronade. The reference in James, that Mil noted, is helpful. There is a table comparing a regular long gun, a Gover gun, and a carronade of the same caliber (24-pounder). James also mentions two other types of shorter guns: the Congreve and Blomefield.

Susan & Mary, Could I ask for help to finding these references. I must have a weird reprint edition of James' "The Naval History of Great Britain" (Stackpole Books, 2002). I cannot find "Gover" listed in the index of any of the six volumes and my volume 4 ends at page 390. Either I have an abridged version (doesn't say that) or the layout is very different. What "year" and "chapter name" contains the reference to Gover (including the table)? How about the "year/chapter name" for the references to the other two shorter guns?

Thanks, Don


Sun Nov 19, 2006 2:48 am
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It's in the "British and French Fleets" section for 1807.

On-line page with Gover gun info

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Sun Nov 19, 2006 3:16 am
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Post Gover Gun
susan wrote:
It's in the "British and French Fleets" section for 1807.
On-line page with Gover gun info

Thanks. For anyone else with my edition, it is on page 279 of Vol. 4. Strangely, that is the same page number as indicated on the on-line version. I have no idea why the index in my book does not contain Gover... but it's not the first index I have found to have errors.

Susan, you're right in that James says that these three short guns are considered "medium guns" rather than carronades. I never knew this medium catagory existed. Thanks again.

Don


Sun Nov 19, 2006 4:55 am
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From the Naval Chronicle (Volume III):

"A trial has been made at Woolwich, under the directions of the Board of Ordnance, in the presence of several Lords of the Admiralty, and a Committee of Field Officers, of two twenty-four pounder guns, mounted upon a patent gun-carriage, lately constructed by Mr. John Gover, of Rotherhithe, upon an entire new principle, for the sea service, one of which was fired nineteen rounds at the target in the short space of nineteen minutes, with admirable effect, and was capable of performing with much more quickness. The other was fired from the battery at the water side, for the purpose of ascertaining the range of the shot, which, to the astonishment of every Officer present, made a range of two thousand yards, though the charge of powder was but four pounds, and the elevation but one degree. The Officers universally expressed their entire satisfaction of this experiment of an invention which appears to be the most perfect of the kind ever discovered."

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Sun Aug 26, 2007 7:16 pm
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