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 Range of long 6-pounder guns? 
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Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:51 pm
Posts: 3
Post Range of long 6-pounder guns?
What would be the longest range of solid shot fired from a 6-pounder? I know the effectiveness was reduced by range, obviously, but I'm curious what the long range might be. Anyone know? Thanks.


Sat Sep 20, 2008 5:53 pm
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:27 am
Posts: 389
Location: Australia
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Ranges (in yards) for 6pdr 17cwt gun, length 6', charge 2lbs, height of gun above the plane 8', firing solid shot:

Elevation:

PB 360
1 deg. 700
2 deg. 1020
3 deg. 1260
4 deg. 1400
5 deg. 1520

Ranges are first graze.

Source: Mariners Mirror Vol. 61 No. 4, pg 409.

Note that there were 6 lengths of the 6pdr in service in 1813. These varied from 8.5' to 6'.


Last edited by IONIA on Sun Sep 21, 2008 2:39 am, edited 1 time in total.



Sat Sep 20, 2008 10:50 pm
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Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:51 pm
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IONIA wrote:
Note that there were 6 lengths of the 6pdr in service in 1813. These varied from 8.5' to 6'.


I'm looking at late 17th century era. Thanks for the numbers. :)


Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:22 am
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 12:27 am
Posts: 389
Location: Australia
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The figures that I quoted were first graze. The extreme range could have been up to eight times the first graze point blank range – say 2500 yds PB ? – subject, of course, to sea conditions allowing grazing.

The table referred to guns using cylinder powder (introduced in 1790).

You will also appreciate that the range figures were not “maximum” ranges. Theoretically I would imagine that the latter could be obtained at an elevation of 40 deg. + but the sea service gun carriage would not have been able to absorb the recoil at this angle of elevation (even if the design of the carriage had permitted it) and you would end up with a dismounted gun and disintegrated carriage. With the quoin completely withdrawn and rear trucks removed perhaps more than 10 deg would be available but then you would have trouble with the upper port sill. With the rear trucks on and with an inclined plane positioned behind them (to dip the muzzle as the gun recoiled) you might get away with 10 deg. During the first half of the nineteenth century ships’ ports seem to have been enlarged to permit of 10 or 11 deg. elevation without the need for an inclined plain.

Late seventeenth century would be a different situation with inferior powder and inferior gun strength.


Sun Sep 21, 2008 3:47 am
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